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Paradox

France HBCM UE Tarn Cokeworks - France - September 2017

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So this was more of a cheeky little explore than anything planned in advance. A few of us were in the South of France for the Urban Explorer Wedding of the Year, an event that was most definitely epic and involved many many drunken selfies of at least half a dozen drunken explorers (including the Bride and Groom) but hey that's another story and not one for here :o

The day after we left the Bride and Groom to do Honeymoony type things ;) and took ourselves off on a trip to the local cokeworks/coal miney type place. It isn't epic or awesome but it was a pretty damn fine mooch to end the trip with.
 

It is a derpy derp and appears to be a popular place to burn out cars but worth a trip anyway :D

 

History is limited and in French so here is my best shot at something that vaguely resembles information but however doesn't mean a great deal to me and is probably worth skipping lol!....

 

The Sainte Marie open pit was a coal mine of the Mining Unit of Tam, H.B.C.M. (Houilleres du Bassin Centre Midi), in the south-western part of France, near Albi. In this area, a large amount of coal has been exploited by Underground mining. This pit was designed in order to exploit the coal remaining around the shaft (Saint Marie shaft) of an old Underground mine situated in the basin of Carmaux.The diameter at the top of the pit was 1200 metres and its final depth was expected to be 300 metres. The first 100 metres were composed of tertiary deposits (clay and sand) which covered the carboniferous formation. The average slope angle of the Tertiary is 37° (without benches) and in the Coal Measures, it was foreseen from 37° to 50° (with benches of 6 metres high) depending on the slope situaüon. At present üme, the depth of the mine is about 160 metres. 

 

Nine coal seams have been mined by Underground working between 1900 and 1984. Different methods have been used depending on the thickness, the dip of the layer and the dimension of the panel. In fact, panels were backfilled, caved or undermined long-wall. The basin of Carmaux is a large synclinal split by a dense network of faults which directions are approximately N 140 E. The dips and the dip directions which was left around the shaft, but, close to the slopes, begin the old exploited long walls. These long walls are at different topographic levels due to the particular structure and have been exploited in panels lined by the faults odented approximately N140.

 

The first design of the open pit was done by a Standard geotechnical survey; this one has taken into account the geomechanical, hydrogeological, structural Parameters äs well äs the "decohesion", induced by the revival of subsidence due to old Underground mining. However, some mining slopes can locally present risks of slipping induced by old Underground mining.

 

Anyway here are a few pics :)

 

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Thanks for looking :)
 

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Thanks guys :) Don't get chance to explore with my sister much these days so it was good to get out and do stuff with her and her son too (and the others too of course!)

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Yet again an absolutely fantastic write up, very interesting. Sure I sure this on FB a few months back, is that a certain mr jobs I see in one of those photos?

 

thanks for sharing 😀

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41 minutes ago, Dubbed Navigator said:

Yet again an absolutely fantastic write up, very interesting. Sure I sure this on FB a few months back, is that a certain mr jobs I see in one of those photos?

 

thanks for sharing 😀

Thanks

 

Lol yes that would be a Mr Jobs you can see :) I did post them on FB a while ago so there is a fair chance you have already seen them!

Edited by Paradox
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22 minutes ago, Paradox said:

Thanks

 

Lol yes that would be a Mr Jobs you can see :) I did post them on FB a while ago so there is a fair chance you have already seen them!

 

Thought so, looks fekkin big! :)

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6 minutes ago, Dubbed Navigator said:

 

Thought so, looks fekkin big! :)

Jobs or the cokeworks?? :4_joy:

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