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The_Raw

France Bureau Central, France - October 2017

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This was the admin block for an adjacent steelworks. It was built in 1704, and despite being pretty battered nowadays, it still retains some of its former grandeur. The mixture of decay and natural light makes it quite photogenic. Plenty of reports from here before so this is just an update on its current state. Visited with @Maniac, @Andyand @extreme_ironing

 

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Thanks for looking you bunch of silly little tossers :thumb 

 

 

 

 

 

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Nice pics there Damo. I've literally this evening finally downloaded my memory cards from this trip, I might even put a report together once I've figured out where to host my photos now I don't have photobucket any more :( 

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You captured it really well, despite the difficult and less light sometimes.

Was a great trip and I'm happy I could show you this place; in my opinion one of the nicest of our trip.

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