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France U-Verlagerung W, France - October 2017

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The first stop on a recent trip to France and Luxembourg with @Andy. A former limestone mine in France, later used during WW2 for the production of oxygen. Quite a small  mine and mostly flooded but there were some nice photos to be had. 

 

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Thanks for looking :thumb 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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12 hours ago, hamtagger said:

Quality pics there :) Is that a cows head far away or a rats head up close? :D 

 

:comp: 

Cheers guys. Think it was a sheep Trev :grin:

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Nice pictures of the cave and of yourself. I liked the different colors inside and of course the lot of skulls. :D 

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