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This location is the one where you quickly hear the stories about: impossible, the mount everest of the urbex,  don't even try ...

 

But sometmes this steel giant likes some company over too and there were rumours of a slight chance to get in.

 

The date was set already and actually something else was on the program but when one fellow exploer had heard that there were loopholes in the net of the impenetrable hell gate (read: fences, 3 rows of nato wire and another  200V power wire as icing on the cake) we wanted to attempt.

 

The hell gate was only a smaller obstacle, because once you pass you are on the playground of little demons in white vans that approach almost without any sound, or with a shepherd dog at their side.

With all of the above in mind, I had a very turbulent night's sleep 3 nights in advance. In the end, the steel gods favoured us that day, which enabled me to enjoy this beautiful exploration.

Very briefly it became exciting when there were 5 people in the building with helmets and hi-visability jackets. After some back-and-forth texting with my mates,  and some cat and mouse tricks to avoid thm, I first hid in a closet and then rushed  me to the top where the rest of our team was. Once there, I crossed the 5 fluos ... 5 eyes on me, 2 of them with open mouth. A French voice 'mais, elle est ici tout seule?' 'vous n'avez pas peur'?

It turned out to be just the most flashy explorers you can imagine, not to mention the decibels they produced.

 

1.

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2.

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3.

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4.

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5.

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6.

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7.

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8.

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9.

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10

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11

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12

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15

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17

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18

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30 minutes ago, jones-y-gog said:

That is truly spectacular!!! The sleepless nights and obstacles looks totally worth it for the reward :17_heart_eyes:

 

 

absolutely!!!! 

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Got that one on my list for some time, can't wait to get there...
I'm glad the metal gods gave you that oppurtunity! :-D Amazing pics, especially 15! (:
That's quite some HDR work, isn't it?

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On 6-12-2017 at 4:47 PM, Arborshate said:

Got that one on my list for some time, can't wait to get there...
I'm glad the metal gods gave you that oppurtunity! :-D Amazing pics, especially 15! (:
That's quite some HDR work, isn't it?

 

It's was not the easiest of all, i should check my RAW's but when I do HDR, i blend them in LR and then edit them a bit more. it gives a quite natural form of HDR, the way i like it the most. 

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Always nice to hear how difficult somewhere is and then see success with perseverance :thumb nice work Dafne, you've come away with a really nice set! 15 & that last shot show the size of the place. Enjoyed this :) 

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