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Andy

Germany Rehabilitation clinic / Physical therapy centre (visited 11/2012) - pic heavy

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Another exploration from the past.

 

History

In the area were several mining operations in the 19th century and many of the miners suffered from pulmonary tuberculosis.

Therefore, in 1897, a sanatorium for the patients with lung disease and anemia was founded. In 1975, this sanatorium was converted into a rehabilitation clinic with physical therapy centre. It was closed in 2002.

In January 2009, the former clinic was vandalized for the first time. Unknown people broke into the building and sprayed several fire extinguishers. The police search for the perpetrators remained fruitless.

After many years of vacancy, there are plans to convert the building into apartments.

 

My visit

The large, L-shaped building had four floors and a newer extension. Exploring the interior was fascinating. The kitchen was almost completely furnished with stoves, large pots, cookware and much more. In many areas there were still furniture and interesting details, and on the lower floor the bathrooms and a swimming pool. I spent several hours there; it was lonely and quiet, and definitely a really worthwhile visit.

 

 

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47 - Title: What Everyone Should Know about Sexuality and Potency ;) 

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Thanks for watching. :) 

 

 

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So much interesting stuff to see and very nicely photographed, as usual. 

Looks like the patients were well looked after there.

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That's a spectacular looking place to photograph @Andy, literally a little bit of everything. Particularly like the body-lift for the swimming pool :) 

 

:comp: 

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On 15.1.2018 at 10:21 AM, hmltnangel said:

Realllly nice place mate. Reminds me a lot of a more intact Raupennest.

 

 

 

 I also was in "Raupennest" four years ago. Last year I received an unfriendly email from the new manager of the building. He wrote me that I had to delete the photos immediately ...

 

 

21 hours ago, prettypeculiar said:

nice to see this one again. we called it 'kurhaus flamingo'back then. 

 

I didn't know this place with the name "Flamingo" so far. When were you there?

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