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Britain's Decays

UK Coronation Street Film Set, Granada Studios, Manchester - Jan 2018

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The old Coronation Street Film set is currently sat, abandoned , waiting demolition. This video shows an explore of the purpose built film set at Granada Studios in Manchester. Although this wasn't the very first film set at the studio it's one of the most well known and remembered amongst fans of the popular soap. The TV show's production was filmed at this location for over 30 years until it was sold to Manchester Quays Its in 2013 to be demolished and replaced with flats, offices, restaurants and hotels.

 

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Fair play I'd quite like to see this for myself. My mum would be well impressed! :2_grimacing: Was this filmed recently? Bit confused that you mentioned 2013 in the text.....

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1 minute ago, The_Raw said:

Fair play I'd quite like to see this for myself. My mum would be well impressed! :2_grimacing: Was this filmed recently? Bit confused that you mentioned 2013 in the text.....

Hey, the studio was closed In 2013, we visited it this month so this video is very recent. It's not the easiest to get in though. If you want to know how we got in I would be glad to explain it to you, but would rather not post it in public as some people get funny about it.

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4 minutes ago, Britain's Decays said:

Hey, the studio was closed In 2013, we visited it this month so this video is very recent. It's not the easiest to get in though. If you want to know how we got in I would be glad to explain it to you, but would rather not post it in public as some people get funny about it.

Cool cheers. I'll drop you a PM mate :thumb 

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I deffo need to see this. i had one go a while back but secca are cocks watching everything etc. Great stuff dont forget about me will ya :-).. Well played getting it done.

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7 hours ago, coolboyslim said:

I deffo need to see this. i had one go a while back but secca are cocks watching everything etc. Great stuff dont forget about me will ya :-).. Well played getting it done.

 Drop me a pm I’ll explain when I get a min from work

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I remember walking round this when it was open to the public!

 

I expect there's a lot of other interesting stuff tucked away in the old studio complex, it's a big old place. I believe there also used to be an access to the Manchester and Salford junction underground canal (later turned into air raid shelters, now abandoned) which runs under the complex.

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1 minute ago, Maniac said:

I remember walking round this when it was open to the public!

 

I expect there's a lot of other interesting stuff tucked away in the old studio complex, it's a big old place. I believe there also used to be an access to the Manchester and Salford junction underground canal (later turned into air raid shelters, now abandoned) which runs under the complex.

 

I found it really interesting how they manage to film it so it looks like it's a full street and the houses are real. Even the taxi rank, police and train station are just facades it's extremely clever filming. The massive picture opposite the bridge is a clever way of giving depth to the street as well.

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