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Did you ever went to an Island full of creepy dolls??? NO??? Let me take you with you!


On my holiday in December 2017 to Mexico I heard about this place so I had to go. There is no holiday without finding some decayed stuff!


The story goes as followed:


The guy who lives on this Island found a girl who was drowned around the island. He also found a doll floating nearby and, assuming it belonged to the deceased girl so he hung it on a tree as a sign of respect. After he did that he heard whispers and foodsteps around his hut where he lived. He started to collect and hang more and more old dolls to calm down the spirit of the drowned girl. In 2001 the owner of the Island died and was found on the same spot where the girl was found.


When I wanted to go to this place I had to find someone who wanted to  bring me there because it was hard to reach according to people around there because of latest hurricanes and earthquakes . After a lot of negotiations I found someone with a little boat to go there and to be honest it was worth the whole trip!! 


























I hope you liked it!


Let me know what you think!


Marco Bontenbal




Edited by Marco Bontenbal
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I saw this place in a television documentary. Your photos are really great, very impressive.

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I saw this title and thought nah Im not clicking. Here I am! Stupid is as stupid does I guess...

My sister made me watch a film when I was 10 called Dolls. It gave me nightmares for years and I could never look at a doll the same since, even now. Its their eyes, they follow you everywhere! Your number 6 picture has now imprinted on my brain. I do like the clown one though :shock: That said, your pics are great and I would probably visit the place myself given the chance despite the nightmares. Great work :thumb 



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