Jump to content

Recommended Posts

On first sight, there´s only a plain building hidden between bushes and coniferes. It´s located on the grounds of a former Soviet military base in Germany. It seems to be like other barracks, nothing special. Yet, while approaching the barrack, attached high walls with barbed wire appear forming a small yard. Rustling branches of the trees which are now growing all over the yard and an icy wind add to the somewhat eerie atmosphere. On entering the building, the darkness is starting to hit you in an instant. Only sparse light shines in. Additionally, the walls were painted with dark and unfriendly colours. Surely, not without reason - simple, yet efficient psychologial means. Here, at the latest, the purpose of the building becomes crystal-clear: it was used as a jail by the Soviet occupiers. What kind of offenses were punished with a stay inside one of these dark cells with bald walls - only equipped with some wooden plank beds - is unknown. 

1
DSC_3093.JPG.6c2bd79c4df1d34ab9142c014093f84b.JPG
2
DSC_3090.JPG.8dc511f3680c0f5fbcc3d269160a6796.JPG
3
DSC_3098.JPG.5f12cec24d37d532b85af6fa7b152fac.JPG
4
DSC_3111.thumb.JPG.71e8deb2623f812b76bc3d428da4cba4.JPG
5

DSC_3102.JPG.1117fdc9a180427dc2eec9fa6fb2605d.JPG
6
DSC_3114.JPG.05823dad425035ed8ac9d6995c4cae12.JPG
7
DSC_3123.JPG.e9bfa44ce5f0c0e2109ad35e5c76647f.JPG
8
DSC_3132.JPG.2966587085c23e7c121f6ccb1726f693.JPG
9
DSC_3144.JPG.1d291d4a3f4ecc5e6a34f0e274b6fa81.JPG
 

  • Like 9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a cool find. Bet someone has some interesting tales from there, somewhere 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

vor 23 Stunden schrieb The_Raw:

That's a cool find. Bet someone has some interesting tales from there, somewhere 

I bet he does...

Edited by franconiangirl

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quite like that :thumb as bare as it is I guess the whole reason your put in jail in the first place isnt for pleasure. Some really nice peely too :)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
vor 21 Stunden schrieb Urbexbandoned:

Quite like that :thumb as bare as it is I guess the whole reason your put in jail in the first place isnt for pleasure. Some really nice peely too :)

Good point. :-D The  average Soviet soldier was definitely treated very badly and I guess especially Soviet jail was no fun. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some really nics pics. And I like the peeled paint.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Similar Content

    • By Andy
      History
       
      The holiday home was built around 1905 and used as a hotel for almost 50 years.
      In the mid-1950s, it was converted into a recreation home of the NVA (National People's Army of the former German Democratic Republic).
       
      The house was closed and abandoned in the 1990s and in 2003 it was bought by a businessman from Heilbronn.
      However, for this person it apparently only serves as a deduction product for the tax return. Because instead of investing and bringing the building back to life, he ignored it, so it fell into decay.
       
      In recent years, the house has been used as a sleeping place by homeless people and has repeatedly been vandalized. On the upper floor, almost all walls are completely sprayed with very bad graffiti now, but I haven't taken any photos of them.
       
       
      1

       
      2

       
      3

       
      4

       
      5

       
      6

       
      7

       
      8

       
      9

       
      10

       
      11

       
    • By Peterchen
      To discover such a time capsule always gives you a lot of pleasure. Whereby you can not speak of small here, because in this beautiful place there were many motifs over several floors.
      Starting with a huge cellar that was filled to the ceiling with unused materials, over several floors that were used for the production of clothing
      to an attic that was converted into a warehouse disused for sewing machines.
       
      However, the long history of the company is relatively fast to tell. A brave entrepreneur founded a small factory in the mid-19th century whose productivity could be increased very quickly.
      When the GDR emerged, the company was expropriated to disappear after the turnaround because they had missed the ravages of time.
       
      Meanwhile, you can not enjoy this time capsule so much, because after the discovery of the object, it was not long before much was destroyed and stolen,
      which ultimately led to the city secured the building and walled the entrances.
       
      More pictures of this huge location can be found here -> http://www.patrick-hertel.de/veb-dessous/
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
       

       

       

       

    • By Ghost-Scooter
      Information about this old brewery is rare. It must have been shut down in the late 1990's when the owner built a modern one in order to increase productivity.
       
      #1
      DSC00779-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
       
      #2
      DSC00781-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
       
      #3
      DSC00780-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
       
      #4
      DSC00788-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
       
      #5
      DSC00830-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
       
      #6
      DSC00793-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet-2 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
       
      #7
      DSC00797-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
       
      #8
      DSC00801-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
       
      #9
      DSC00802-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
       
      #10
      DSC00804-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
       
      #11
      DSC00806-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
       
      #12
      DSC00817-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
       
      #13
      DSC00825-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
    • By Punk
      History
       
      Owned and operated by Philadelphia Electric Company (now Exelon), the Port Richmond power generation station was built from 1919 to 1925. Designed by architect John T. Windrim and engineer W.C.L. Eglin, the coal-fired electrical generation plant was placed into service in 1925 and the station’s Neoclassical Revival design was used by the company to reflect permanence, stability, and responsibility. As designed, the station was to contain three distinct generating components; each component was to consist of a boiler house to produce steam, a turbine hall, and a switch gear building to control power distribution. At its peak, the Port Richmond station’s four huge steam turbines had a capacity of 600 megawatts.
       

       
      Explore
       
      This was the first mooch of a 3 week trip to the States.
      Philadelphia was a very interesting experience. Within 36 hours of arriving in Philly, I witnessed a racial gun incident, got pulled by the local law enforcement and saw a cop attacked with a firework. A week before I arrived the Eagles won their first Superbowl and the locals trashed the city in celebration. Interesting city, Philadelphia.
      Mooched around here with a guy from Montana and we enjoyed a few beers while walking around. Nice quiet explore, only interrupted when a scrappy followed us around briefly. I had been looking forward to this for months, and it was made better by the mist that had rolled in from the Delaware River.
       
      (1)
       

       
      (2)
       

       
      (3)
       

       
      (4)
       

       
      (5)
       

       
      (6)
       

       
      (7)
       

       
      (8)
       

       
      (9)
       

       
      (10)
       

       
      (11)
       

       
      (12)
       

       
      (13)
       

       
      (14)
       

       
      (15)
       
      (
       
      (16)
       

       
      (17)
       

       
      (18)
       

       
      (19)
       

       
      (20)
       

       
      (21)
       

       
      (22)
       

       
      (23)
       

       
      (24)
       

       
      (25)
       

       
      Cheers for Looking

















































×