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evo_mad

St Athan Boys Village, South Wales - Report Aug 08

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That was an awesome explore, had some fun until the scum turned up.

Here's some of mine, bear in mind it was getting dark whilst we were there so the pics are poor.

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Bible found under the floor

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Hood_mad going up the bell tower

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Looking down

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Up to the second floor

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Me on the way up

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Waterfall at the outdoor pool

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Fire on the gym that was already burning when we got there (I think we disturbed someone)

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A good, but very surreal experience.

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Ooo seems a bit strange that does. nevertheless great pics lads!

i especially like the one looking at the mast through the window

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Guest dangerous dave

sadly i have no pics to add to this but the avoid the pikies was good fun tho

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    • By Fatpanda
      what a lovely find this one was, gonna keep this really short as i am using the on screen keyboard haha
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      Calcott Hall
       
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      The Pictures
       
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      Little bonus car in the garage in the grounds..

       
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