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vanishing days

Matthew's Riding School - Rainham - Kent - 2008 PIK HEAVY

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this is the first place i ever went suffered many years of damage and neglect.

built in the 80s by tony Rokko a local businessman named after his son who unfortunately passed away.

the place was internationally nown but was hsut due to tony rokko wanted the road access improved and was told no by the government shortly after the place closed down. next door is the hotel wich mr rokko turned into a mansion were he lived. any way on with the pics

exterrior shots

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riding track outside i like lights

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reception

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stables

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Main arena

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Toilets

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cool old rides

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Upstairs

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Cafe

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view from uptop

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las pampas the bar

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Maybe not

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pictures

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the end

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Wow :o Ide love to visit this place. Is it still there?

Fantastic Pics again vanishing days. I think that place is worth an explore before it gets to badly smashed by the local chavs

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  • Similar Content

    • By franconiangirl
      I have hardly any information about this former boarding school. Apparently it was an institute for boys only. The building is in a decaying state. Fortunately, the vandalism isn´t too bad so far. The size of this insitution almost kills you. It´s very emotional to explore this part of history, when obviously a stong religious belief was one of the most important parts of education. 

      As already mentioned above, this institution was huge. It´s picturesquely embedded between hills. It consisted not only of numerous dormitories and classrooms but its own chapel  and infirmary - with rusty bed frames and old medical stuff left behind - as well. You´ll find traces of religious importance again and again, for example old images of saints - to remind you over and over about the importance of a strong belief that was once an omnipresent theorem in this institution. Let the pictures speak for themselves. 


























       
    • By Wevsky
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    • By Space Invader
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      This is a large and interesting complex, located at the northern end of a tight triangular junction with the Sheerness-on-Sea branch. First proposed in 1969, the construction of Sheerness Steel Works was given the go-ahead in 1971, building work beginning in that September on land largely occupied by Army playing fields. The building cost was priced at £10,000,000 (£105,921,790 at 2008 prices), and included swallowing up a goods yard recently made redundant by British Rail.
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    • By BadBatz
      Another one from our trip down South.
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      In 1864, Fr Herbert Vaughan, the later Cardinal Vaughan, gained approval to build a missionary seminary in England. On the 28th February 1871, after considerable difficulties had been overcome, the new seminary in Mill Hill, London, was built and occupied under the patrimony of St Joseph.
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      Not a huge place but was nice to revisit after it being not possible for such a while
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