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Great Western Line Bridge - Nottingham 13.01.09

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First report of the new year, and by gum was it worth it

I'm sure some of you will recall the lengths at which I attempted to persuade my fellow Nottingham lad BravoZeRo to join me for climbing this.

Not to be compared with the likes of that bloody show off Dsankt and his ridicules contribution regarding high stuff, this is a first for me...

On with the pics, its basically a bridge over a railway cutting thats currently undergoing restoration.

At teh bottom..

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Me getting my climbing fix at last..

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BravoZeRo touching the top of the arch

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Nearly at the top

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Up top

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Well worth the wait was great fun, can't wait to go back in the day :D

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Nice pic's bro!

I'd put mine up, but there only of the top an there crap!

Defo gonna go back, at like 12/1am! really want to get some better photo's, of top an bottom of the bridge, crappy touch! :oops:

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Looks fun to me even if it's not ZOMGEPIC$. Tower bridge you say... I'm not sure it's worth getting shot for.

Haha says Mr lets go explore the london underground, I'd be up for tower bridge :lol:

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