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Stone Monastery of the Monks. 2009

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    • By Siren
      This is a classic mooch from a little while back, only never got around to actually reporting it anywhere! This site is now completely redeveloped, so no chance of future explores unfortunately
      HISTORY
      Stone House Hospital, formerly the City of London Lunatic Asylum, was a hospital and former mental illness treatment facility in Stone, near Dartford, Kent. The hospital has been closed since 2007 amd has since been under redevelopment into flats.
      Stone House was originally constructed between 1862 and 1866 at the behest of the London Commissioners in Lunacy to provide for pauper lunatics from the London area at a cost of £65,000. The buildings were designed in a Tudor Revival architecture style by James Bunstone Bunning, and the facility accommodated 220 patients.
      AERIAL VIEW

      THE EXPLORE - 14.3.2012
      With a little pointer from a 'contact' we were able to enjoy an explore without too much interruption. The builders were obviously having a lay in, as it wasnt until after lunchtime that they started getting suspitious! By then we'd got most of our shots and made a stealthy retreat!
      THE PHOTOS

















      THANKS FOR LOOKING!!


      And finally! Who can you spot left in the dust?!

    • By he who must rome
      Well we were very disappointed with this mine due to not having our 4gas meter..... all i will say is if you go in FFS take a meter 30 yards in we could not breath hardly and that was just walking, the mine had NO air flow at all..... time for the pics
      first the beach with the fossils



      within the mine









      next time we go it will be with a meter and i hope better air.....
      if you go in please be careful ....death awaits !...
    • By he who must rome
      This was our second visit to this area, i have no history on this place all i can tell you is it is a stone quarry with 4 stone mines within the faces, there was a rail line within the quarry which went down hill to the railway for off loading there stone.
      on with the pics.

      2 of the ways in woot.



      A reet nice 'miners deads' wall













      hope you liked the pic's ill see what info i can dig up, to be honest im mowed under with work
    • By Space Invader
      This was are second attempt at this place, After the weekend before we were caught by secca before making it in the building we gained entry this time and were fine for a few hours then bang all the contractors lighting come on and in walk secca, Time to do legs a memory i dont think i will ever forget me and the overs running down the hallway like something out of a benny hill sketch So after we were caught well 3 of us, well done obs We where asked to delete are pics which as they were both quite understanding and we didn't seem to have any over options and it was still early and there was always plan b to be getting on with we agreed i must of pushed the wrong button as i went to delete my pics but to be honest secca NO FUCKING CHANCE so after they thought they had succeeding wasting are time , we where escorted of site were we meet back up with obs and drove of to plan b
      visited with wevsky ,obscurity and maniac
      a little history...
      Stone House Hospital, formerly the City of London Lunatic Asylum, was a hospital and former mental illness treatment facility in Stone, near Dartford, Kent, in the United Kingdom. As of November, 2007 the hospital has been closed, and bids have been taken for its redevelopment to house luxury flats.[1]
      Stone House was originally constructed between 1862 and 1866 at the behest of the London Commissioners in Lunacy to provide for pauper lunatics from the London area at a cost of £65,000 [2] The buildings were designed in a Gothic brick style by James Bunstone Bunning, and the facility accommodated 220 patients.[3] The asylum grounds, at first 33 acres (130,000 m2) and later expanded to 140 acres (0.57 km2), included a working farm.[4] Additions to the original buildings were made in 1874, 1878, and 1885, including an expanded female wing and a separate hospital building for patients with infectious diseases.[5]
      The first medical superintendent of the Asylum was Dr. Octavius Jepson, who served from the opening of the facility through 1887; on his death twelve years later, he was buried in the asylum's cemetery.[6] He was succeeded by Dr. Ernest White, who served until his retirement in 1904. The third superintendent was Dr. Robert Hunter Steen, who was in turn succeeded in 1924 by Dr. William Robinson. Robinson retired in 1942, but due to wartime staff shortages his permanent replacement, Dr. Hardwick, was not appointed until 1946; on the takeover by NHS his new title became Physician Superintendent, which brought additional powers and responsibilities.[7] He was succeeded upon his retirement in 1959 by Dr. Cates (1959-1963), who was the last to hold the title, as the NHS decided to delegate day-to-day operations to a chief Consulting Psychiatrist.
      After 1892, the asylum was able to take "private" patients (patients whose fees were paid by their families, or from pensions). The influx of private patients resulted in a budget surplus, and enabled expansion and improvements of the asylum's facilities. In 1924 the facility was renamed the City of London Mental Hospital, and in 1948 it was taken over by the new National Health Service and became known as Stone House Hospital. A 1998 assessment by Thames Healthcare suggested that the hospital was not suited for modern healthcare; plans for the hospital's closure were initiated in 2003 by West Kent NHS.
      Among its most famous patients was the poet and composer Ivor Gurney, who resided there from 1922 until his death in 1937.
      on with the pics ...
















      thanks for looking
    • By TheBaronof Scotland
      first day of our trip for Euro Explore
      really interesting place





















      Cheers
      THE BARON
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