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Wevsky

Oil mills upper & Lower 14th 10/2010

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Your only as old as you feel Wevsky. If it makes you feel better, you not as old as my folks.

thanks swamp_donkey you saythe right things..40 isnt old,its just half me 'sploring mates parents are younger tha n me..still age holds no boundrys just means some of us are rounder in the middle area?!!

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Awesome pics as usual Gents, as for the age issue, Its just a state of mind I find personally youre just as old as you feel or is it the woman you feel :lol: ,If you guys are going back I would be very privileged to join you.

:cool2:

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Awesome pics as usual Gents, as for the age issue, Its just a state of mind I find personally youre just as old as you feel or is it the woman you feel :lol: ,If you guys are going back I would be very privileged to join you.

:cool2:

well uncle b forgot camera..so it is going to happen..will as ever have to work out when got a few things for our night out next week planned

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........more random light painting from The Upper'n Lower Oil Mills

1

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2 even found a Orb floating about too

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3

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4

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5 Fat Wreck

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6

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7 blimey, a Orb & a Vortex

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8

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9 and just as we were leaving a green Orb came out to see wot we were doing

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:Devil:

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......na afraid not, we had to leave, spent far too long in The Upper Mills :Devil:

i havnt as yet climbed the ,any walls..been told theres a few odds and sods past theones on the stairs.also the way you go in theres a crawl space just to the left that leads into it at a different point and near the live area was another place to crawl we just didnt get round to it ,,memate left his battery at home!!

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Yes I remember that, loads of crawling around. Been meaning to go back and enter a few more holes :D

Every one loves a hole matey!

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  • Similar Content

    • By MrObvious
      Thought i'd keep these 2 in the same report because they were part of the same company. 

      History
       
      Mills... 
       
      Tonedale Mills, including Tone Mills, was a large wool factory in Wellington, Somerset that was the largest woollen mill in South West England. Owned by Fox Brothers, it was most famous for the production of “Taunton serge”, and later the khaki dye used by the British Army. The mill was established in the middle of the eighteenth century, and thrived during the industrial revolution. At its peak, around 6,500 metres of material was produced at the factory each day. The cheap cost of producing fabric in third-world countries contributed to the factory mostly closing during the 1980s.

      Dye Works...
      Due to the acquisition of the old flour mills this became the cloth finishing works. Sitting on the banks of the River Tone, the mills originally used water wheels on the river for power generation, the housing for which are still in place. Later with the introduction of steam and then electric power, the water was used as part of the cloth finishing process, and was managed more carefully with the introduction of a reservoir and sluice gates. Within the reservoir, the water was treated before its use. The finishing works and dye factory were both on this site. The former had a boiler house attached, while the latter had an engine house added.
       
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      when we arrived at the dye works, access was fairly simple, unaware of where access into the main bit, i'd managed to piss on it lmao, luckily there was shit loads of tarp laying around...
      When we finished up at the dye works, we headed back to the mills with a better route to take. This place was massive, and was slowly being taken over by nature!
      after spending a little while in there, we'd bumped into a couple of chavs who thought we were there ghost hunting... Then they started to trash the place, so we made a swift exit. 
      During the first visit i was told about the boiler rooms... but we had to skip it incase the police turned up. 

      so i headed back there a couple days later with @CuriousityKilledTheCat
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      Enjoy  
       
      Mills
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      Dye Works 
       

       

       

       

       

       

       
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    • By Andy
      Unfortunately, I don't know any history.
      By the way, all photos were only taken from the outside, through the bars of the windows. Therefore, no access was possible - or if, only by a deep cellar window. But even that wasn't possible because of local residents. So I only took a few photos from the outside and then we drove on.
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    • By Funlester
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    • By Stussy


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      Thats all there is really, thanks for looking.

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