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Nelly

Copford Place - Copford, Colchester - Jan 2011

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Copford Place is a 18th century Grade II listed building in the village of Copford, 5 miles west of Colchester

British History Online has this to say about it.....

"Apparently late 17th century, a two storeyed, sevenbayed, doublepile house that forms the south range of Copford Place; it contains a chimneypiece dated 1698 and other fittings of about that date. The house probably then faced the road and was of red brick like the stable to the north. In the early 19th century the house was extended northeast by two bays to create an east entrance and given plain classical white brick fa¸ades. In 1947 it was converted into private accommodation for elderly people, and in 1980 taken over by Help the Aged which in 1998 refurbished the house as self contained flats"

Explored this place straight after a Laurel and Hardy style explore at Severalls, I came away feeling disappointed with this house but then I suppose after Severalls then this was like a polished turd!!

Sorry for the flash photos, it was boarded top and bottom :(

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In the attic room we found a squat. It was very tidy with no damage. It had obviously only been occupied by one person, there was a sleeping bag, his shoes, saucepans, a CD player etc. The sell by dates on the food wrappers went back to 2009, I felt sorry for the guy, I think that he may have come back to find the place boarded and fenced with all his gear inside.

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The Barn - This is also a Grade II listed building

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I take my photos on a Samsung Compact digital, the maximum shutter time is 8 seconds which is often long enough, but not for the very dark stuff.

A DSLR is on my birthday list!!!!

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I take my photos on a Samsung Compact digital, the maximum shutter time is 8 seconds which is often long enough, but not for the very dark stuff.

A DSLR is on my birthday list!!!!

I used to ..well first 3 explores was my nokia mobile fone the reports picture quality was pants..then the wife got me a dslr for my birthday..all good tho mate

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Although there's not a lot there, the marble fireplace and that staircase make it worthwhile!

Thanks for posting.

M

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well nice place and info you have posted with them.....cheers for sharing.........oh 8 seconds is easy good for dark places trust me i go caving with an Olympus 1030 sw point n click and either a torch or slave flash on a 5 second exposure ....... :thumb:thumb:thumb

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    • By Session9


      SEVERALLS HOSPITAL - DECEMBER 2014

      Severalls Hospital history
      The 300-acre (1.2 km2) site housed some 2000 patients and was based on the "Echelon plan" - a specific arrangement of wards, offices and services within easy reach of each other by a network of interconnecting corridors. This meant that staff were able to operate around the site without the need to go outside in bad weather. Unlike modern British hospitals, patients in Severalls were separated according to their gender. Villas were constructed around the main hospital building as accommodation blocks between 1910 and 1935. Most of the buildings are in the Queen Anne style, with few architectural embellishments, typical of the Edwardian period. The most ornate buildings are the Administration Building, Larch House and Severalls House (originally the Medical Superintendent's residence).
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      Building work is now up to the perimeter of the main site on the eastern side. This includes the construction of a new road that will link the A12 with the junction of the Northern Approach Road and Mill Road which covers land where several villa's once stood along with part of the former cricket pitch. As a consequence the dog walker's path is closed whilst the new road(s) intersect it. In my theory the new road will provide a good way to carry poor old Severalls away once demolition starts, as it avoids the majority of residential areas with a useful direct link to the A12. The new road is now nearing completion and a spur from the new link road leads ominously up to the main perimeter fence. This year, could be her last...
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      1. Full moon - it was not to be sadly.

      2. Day room.. at night.

      3.

      4. Ok, i can hear: "what the hell is that?". I liked this effect, night sky on glazed tiles in the smaller kitchen.

      5. Cold kitchen. Yes, it really was cold - middle of winter is always the best time to do an all nighter .

      6. On to the next day and ablutions time.

      7. I think we were feeling 'vacant' after ten plus hours...

      8. Far Male Wards. These were at least 20 degrees warmer than the female side for anyone thinking of repeating this exercise.

      9.

      10.

      11.

      12. Severalls one and only chair. With the bed gone, this is the only comfort around .

      13.

      14. Path to paradise.
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