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he who must rome

God !!!!!.....My head Hurtz

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If i ever needed a 'Camera Geek' then now is the time !. I had an accident at work, won my case and now looking for the 'right camera for me'

2 cameras come straight to mind the Cannon 7D and the Nikon d7000 question is which bloody one as both look like they have good reviews for what i have read.....could I have any input from anyone who uses either camera !, I'm not after a pro Cannon or pro Nikon user but some impartial advice please.

things i am wishing to do with which ever camera i obtain (eventually)

underground photography is big on my list from caves to tunnels

to every kind of situation under the sun top side !!!

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Im sure obscurity is your man for that question i think a friend has a d700..but thats a little bit more expensive as its full frame!!

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The first thing I'd observe about those two is the Nikon D700 is full frame, where as the Canon 7D is APS-C crop. A more like-for-like comparison maybe a Nikon D700 or a Canon 5D mk II as these are pretty much directly comparable being both full frame and both roughly in the same price bracket.

The second thing to bear in mind is availability of lens' that work properly on a full frame camera is more limited than a cropped sensor, so consider that before deciding to buy full frame. There's a high chance none of your existing len's will work, or if they do you'll get vignetting effects or simelar at the edges of your images unless the lens is specifically designed for full frame. You will pay a premium for new glass that works properly, as they have to be designed with full frame in mind. On the plus side thou, you don't have to get stupidly wide len's to get the same field of view because, for example, a 28mm lens on a full frame camera will give you roughly the same field of view as a 18mm lens on a APS-C cropped sensor. See good old wikipedia for an explanation of sensor cropping if you're not already aware. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crop_factor

With regards chosing a brand, it's much of a muchness really. Both Canon and Nikon both have strong followings in the professional market and as such the availability of accessories and len's are very good for both and the costs are comparable. What I'd do is find a decent camera shop that may have one or both of the cameras in stock and go and hold them, have a play with them and see which one feels right in your hand. I personally have chosen Canon as my prefered brand, but I still think Nikon cameras are just as good - I'm just used to how canon cameras work.

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The first thing I'd observe about those two is the Nikon D700 is full frame, where as the Canon 7D is APS-C crop. A more like-for-like comparison maybe a Nikon D700 or a Canon 5D mk II as these are pretty much directly comparable being both full frame and both roughly in the same price bracket.

The second thing to bear in mind is availability of lens' that work properly on a full frame camera is more limited than a cropped sensor, so consider that before deciding to buy full frame. There's a high chance none of your existing len's will work, or if they do you'll get vignetting effects or simelar at the edges of your images unless the lens is specifically designed for full frame. You will pay a premium for new glass that works properly, as they have to be designed with full frame in mind. On the plus side thou, you don't have to get stupidly wide len's to get the same field of view because, for example, a 28mm lens on a full frame camera will give you roughly the same field of view as a 18mm lens on a APS-C cropped sensor. See good old wikipedia for an explanation of sensor cropping if you're not already aware. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crop_factor

With regards chosing a brand, it's much of a muchness really. Both Canon and Nikon both have strong followings in the professional market and as such the availability of accessories and len's are very good for both and the costs are comparable. What I'd do is find a decent camera shop that may have one or both of the cameras in stock and go and hold them, have a play with them and see which one feels right in your hand. I personally have chosen Canon as my prefered brand, but I still think Nikon cameras are just as good - I'm just used to how canon cameras work.

Ah mike the original nikon he who must roam mentioned was the d7000 not full frame i confused things by mentinoning the d700 ;)

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Ah mike the original nikon he who must roam mentioned was the d7000 not full frame i confused things by mentinoning the d700 ;)

Damn you, I wrote all that for no reason! lol

Ah well.

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Ah mike the original nikon he who must roam mentioned was the d7000 not full frame i confused things by mentinoning the d700 ;)

Damn you, I wrote all that for no reason! lol

Ah well.

It was very informative tho mike..really it was :)

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