Jump to content
  • ×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

      Only 75 emoticons maximum are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Similar Content

    • By Forgotten ulster
      History :
      Casement Park (Irish: Páirc Mhic Asmaint) is the principal Gaelic Athletic Association stadium in Belfast, Northern Ireland, home to the Antrim football and hurling teams. Located on the Andersonstown Road in the west of the city, and named after the Republican revolutionary Sir Roger Casement (1864-1916), the ground has a capacity of 32,600.[1]
      Casement Park, one of the largest stadia in Ulster, opened in June 1953, with Armagh Harps defeating St John’s of Antrim in the final of the inaugural Ulster Senior Club Football Championship.[2] The newly opened Casement Park hosted the Ulster Championship final less than a month later, which saw Armagh overcome reigning All-Ireland champions Cavan.
      In all, Casement Park has hosted eight Ulster football finals. However, the Antrim ground has not held the provincial showpiece since 1971, with St. Tiernach's Park in Clones hosting the final every year since except between 2004 and 2006 when it was moved to Croke Park such was the demand for tickets. A major facelift of the stadium took place in 2000, a move which saw more championship games played at Casement Park. In 2006, floodlights were added which allowed hurling and football to be played in the evening.
      In 2006, proposals were raised to build a new multi-purpose stadium on the site of the old Maze prison near Lisburn, which was intended to host association football, rugby union and Gaelic games. However, opposition to the idea led to it being dropped in favour of a new venue in the Sydenham area of East Belfast. This led to Ulster GAA, which was one of the partners in the Maze project, to pull out in favour of remaining at Casement Park.[3]
      In 2011, the Northern Ireland Executive announced that it had granted £138m for various stadium redevelopment projects throughout Northern Ireland. Ulster GAA would receive £61.4m of this, which was to be used to redevelop Casement Park into a 40,000 all-seated stadium with £15 million of partnership investment from the Central Council of the GAA, making it the largest stadium in Ulster.[4]
      In early 2012 it was announced that the redevelopment work would start at the end of 2013 with a view to having the new stadium open by September 2015. It was expected that, after its completion, Ulster GAA would move its headquarters from St Tiernach's Park in Clones to Casement Park,[5] which would then have a seating capacity of about 40,000.[6]
      In December 2014 the granting of planning permission for the redevelopment of Casement Park was ruled unlawful.
      On 28 April 2016 the team behind the Casement Park redevelopment proposals launched a consultation process in an effort to see what the general public's views are. On the 14th November 2016 Casement Park was officially included as part of Ireland's 2023 Rugby World Cup bid.
      2006 controversy
      A decision in 2006 by the Antrim County Board to permit the use of Casement Park to host a Republican rally in commemoration of the deaths of Provisional IRA and INLAprisoners in the 1981 hunger strike drew criticisms from unionists.
       
      Visited in late 2015, casement lies the same today although work on redevelopment is expected to start very soon. knowing the social club was still in use allowed access to part of the ground and the rest i just had to blagg.























    • By Baldrickthecunning
      West Park was a nice site, but every man and his dog knew about it and the same shots used to get taken time and again. Reaperman (of http://abandoned-britain.com/ ) and I decided to do a night visit at a time when the place was extremely popular, and use it more as an experimenting ground for natural and artificially lit shots. Our aim wasn't to cover much ground, but to take shots until they came out right!
      It was a good experience and co-ordinating the lighting was good fun. Simply lit with torches and 2 coloured gels.













      Mr. B
    • By Lara
      I know this place has been done loads but we had to do it. We had a amazing day surrounded by secca and builders and we some how managed not to get caught. I think this was the easiest splore ever for us!
      Splored with Miss.Anthrope










      Thanks for looking x
    • By masodo
      HISTORY

       
      wiki text: Riverside Amusement Park was an amusement park in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA from 1903 to 1970. Originating as a joint venture between engineer/amusement park developer Frederick Ingersoll and Indianapolis businessmen J. Clyde Power, Albert Lieber, and Bert Fiebleman and Emmett Johnson, the park was built by Ingersoll's Pittsburgh Construction Company adjacent to Riverside City Park at West 30th Street between White River and the Central Canal in the Riverside subdivision of Indianapolis.
       
      The decade of the 1960s was not a kind one for Riverside Amusement Park, which was losing attendance for the first time since the end of World War II. By the time John Coleman lifted the "whites only" policy (in response to a series of protests organized by the NAACP Youth Council in 1963), the park was losing $30,000 a year.
       
      Increased cost of insurance, maintenance, and new rides, coupled with increased competition from the emerging theme parks, were cited by Coleman as the park closed for the last time at the end of the 1970 season. All the rides were sold or demolished by 1978.
       
      The land lay undisturbed for more than two decades, until the construction of the River's Edge subdivision in the early 2000s.
       

       
      ===========================================================================================================================================
       
      STORY
      In 1979 my buddies and I heard that they were getting ready to bulldoze the site of the long defunct Riverside Amusement Park in Indianapolis so we decided to drive by to get a final look. When we got there we were amazed to find easy access to the grounds. With my trusty Practica LLC at hand we ventured within and explored for several minutes until we came to the stark realization that this neglected plot of land had become the home to countless wild dogs. Picking up debris for clubs we beat a hasty retreat (pausing of course for a commemorative selfie.)
       
      The pictures were taken on 35mm slide film...  Back in 2005 I came across the slides and crapily scanned them using a junky flat-bed scanner and used those images to create the Animated GIF below to send cross country via email to one of the krew.
       
      If there is a prize for worst images on OS these would surely take it - but even in this 'State' they trigger memories of that adventure; so in that they are still doing their job...
       
      Impressionists Views of Riverside Amusement Park (circa 1979)

      I opened this GIF and extracted the individual images and tried to enhance them to some degree.
      I then repackaged thumbnails of these into a fresh GIF that is marginally more effective than the original.
      (shown at end of report)
       

      Ticket Booth
       

      Shoot 25¢
       

      From Inside Ring-Toss
       

      Main Attraction
       

      The Weed-lined Path
       

      Wheee!
       

      Domed (Doomed) Skating Rink
       

      Three scared cats in a dog park! (that's me on the right rockin' the Frampton 'do)
       

      Take Two
       
      If I ever come across the original transparencies again I will have to get some proper enlargements made.
    • By franconiangirl
      The small funeral chapel was an accidental find. The chapel is located a bit seclusively in an area which is off the beaten track anyway. But the area around it appears to be pretty neat. The chapel hardly catches anybody´s  eyes. Only the exact observer will spot it. That might be the reason why the shmall church is still in a pretty good condition. 

      You´ll approach and explore a very peaceful place. A metall door, that leads into the cellar, is half-open. You can´t see anything but darkness. I walk by the door and enter the chapel from behind through an open door. As soon as I had entered the chapel, It appeared to me that this place wasn´t an ordinary chapel. It was obviously used as a funeral chapel. The first room you´ll enter is a tiled room, which was apparently used for washing and preparing the bodies before burial. After that you´ll reach the actual chapel. which was used for funeral ceremonies. An old, red carpet is still lying around and a big cross is still painted on the wall. In the attic you´ll find the former staff rooms. 

      While my fellow-urbexers were taking their photos in the chapel, I remembered the door leading into the cellar. So I went to explore the cellar on my own. Cellars have never been my favorite place but after knowing about the purpose of this chapel it definitely didn´t help to feel better. I had barely squeezed through the door when I saw the construction on the stairs, which was obviously used for the transportation of the bodies up and down the stairs. Someone had placed a broken cruzifix on it.  I went down the stairs following them into the pitch-dark cellar. I was right in the middle of the former morgue of the chapel. An old apron was hanging on the door, a wooden cross leaning against the wall. Even old utensils for preparing the bodies. In a side room was the former cooling room with the mortuary refrigerator (tightly closed). In the next small room you could find old coffin lids.  My eyes became gradually adjusted to the darkness, which let the place appear less scary. 

      When my friends started to capture the cellar, I waited on an old stone bench. It was a wonderfull autumn´s day. I really felt the tranquility of this place. If these walls could talk, this place could tell many stories of grief and goodbyes. Yet, the peacefulness and the location of this place even comforted me. Such a nice place to say good-bye. 
















       
×