Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Wevsky

UK The Cave of Vortigern Margate, Kent 11/12-02/13

Recommended Posts

Visited with Obscurity Stealth SpaceInvader UrbanGinger and Fortknox0 and on two different visits

Nice to get back in here with a dslr as last time was early days and a camera fone,its not huge but was worth going back for a better look

The origins of these caves, which are not natural but built by man, is shrouded in mystery. The caves may take their name from Vortigern, who supposedly gave the area around Margate to the Saxons as a reward for helping him fight the Picts and Scots. Rediscovered by accident in 1798, the caves are considered by some to be of Saxon origin, consisting of a series of natural passages, which have been artificially enlarged. However, few experts think these 'artificial cavities' (as they are called) go back that far. The first time they appear in history is fairly recent. The guide book would have the visitor believe that the caves are over a 1000 years old and possible even of Phoenician origin! The more likely explanation would perhaps be a more modest medieval origin, or even a Georgian folly. Locally they put the Shell Grotto down as a Victorian folly built at a time when the local shell fish industry would have produced enough shells for them to be freely available (being a by-product).

Somewhere near the close of the 18th Century, a man of eccentric habits, named Francis Forster, built a large house in Margate which he named after the county of his birth - Northumberland House. In or about the year 1798 his gardener, digging behind the house, made the discovery of the Caves. A private entrance was cut. It was during this time that the cave murals were created. In 1914, a new entrance was made from the cellar of the vicarage and this is the entrance used today.

On with some pics

Quick map

margatecaves.jpg

DSC_00301.jpg

DSC_0029_8.jpg

DSC_0023_10.jpgDSC_00181.jpg

DSC_0028_6.jpg

DSC_0020_6.jpg

DSC_0017_7.jpgDSC_0004_11.jpg

DSC_0029-1.jpg

DSC_0011_10.jpg

DSC_0023-1.jpgDSC_0009_8.jpg

DSC_0008_12.jpg

DSC_0014_4.jpg

DSC_0028-1.jpg

Not a huge place but was nice to revisit after it being not possible for such a while

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Proper nice that, reminds me of some of the sandstone caves in that fair town of Nottingham.

Them sandstone ones look proper nice..i think i have a survey on me maps with lots of stuff up there..must actualy look at it properly

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By -Raz-
      After finding ourselves in a live swimming baths in Birmingham we had a short trip to West Brom to have a look at this place which from the outside doesn't look too big but once inside its huge, loads of interesting stuff!
      Visited with @hamtagger & @Fatpanda
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      Cheers for looking
    • By The Urban Collective
      Hey, guys, this is a video from my recent exploration of Manchester's Victoria Arches.
      Unfortunately, we were caught entering and as I couldn't resist taking a peak I went it alone. However, we will be back to make a proper video report on the place.
      I was absolutely gutted to not get a proper vid but the footage I did get was half decent and worth it for the experience alone. This place holds so many memories and it is astonishing to wonder whats under our feet.
       
       
       
    • By UrbanLurking
      Explored here a couple of weeks ago seems a bit destroyed now which is a shame bet it was a decent explore at one point. 
      A bit of history,
      Royal Army Ordnance Corp (RAOC) Marchington, was built around 1957 and dealt with the supply and maintenance of weaponry and munitions and various other military equipment until 1993 when the Corp amalgamated with the Royal Logistics Corp. The site is now an industrial estate. It was also a Central Vehicle Depot during this time until the barracks closed in 1970, and the Territorial Army took over. Until it finally closed the site in the early 1980s. Marchington also housed the Armys fleet of Green Goddesses which came under the jurisdiction of the Office Of The Deputy Prime Minister (ODPM).The site is now an industrial estate. The Barracks lie bare and derelict and the married quaters have are all now private housing.
       




    • By AndyK!
      The Station Hotel is a grand Victorian building situated in the heart of Ayr town centre. The hotel consists of 71 bedrooms, complete with en-suite bathrooms, plus a host of suits for functions and a cocktail lounge.
       
      The hotel, which is attached to Ayr railway station, was originally opened by the Glasgow and South Western Railway in June 1866 and become part of the British Transport Hotels (BTH) at Nationalisation. It was sold by BTH in October 1951 and has changed ownership a number of times, having been owned by Stakis Hotels, Quality, and Swallow Hotels.
       
      The Station Hotel is currently the oldest and most famous hotel in Ayr. The hotel has retained almost all of its original features inside and out. The hotel started to turn away customers in 2014 and closed around 2015. After suffering neglect for some time beforehand, the building is now deteriorating; the railway station have had to take action to safeguard their customers from falling debris.
       
      Visited with
      @SpiderMonkey


      The car park is fenced off due to parts of the exterior falling off


      Entrance and staircase


      Reception




      Lift and staircase on the first floor

      Into the cocktail lounge....










      The corridor leading to the next parts was suffering decay due to leaks in the roof

      The Arran Suite...





      Restaurant...








      The restaurant's kitchen



      Other public spaces around the hotel...


       The Kyle Suite bar area

       
      The Carrick Room 

       
      The Kintyre Suite

       

      And finally, the hotel rooms...

       

       

       

       
      View of the decaying rear facade overlooking the railway station
    • By little_boy_explores
      Dobroyd mill
       

       
      The history
       
      Dobroyd Mills was built in 1829. A fine cloth manufacturer Dobroyd Ltd was founded at the mill in 1919. The mill closed in 1974, but was re-opened in 1976 under John Woodhead Ltd spinners. It currently houses several businesses including a classic car restoration firm and tea rooms. The future of Dobroyd Mills became a subject of debate when the current owners Z Hinchliffe began reducing the height of the chimney last year (2011). Concerned neighbours referred Dobroyd Mill to the English Heritage when the works began. But an inspector from  English Heritage decided the Mill was not suitable for the list of buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest.  Planning permission to knock down two sections on the northern end of the complex was granted by Kirklees Council last month (2012). The stone structures were deemed unsuitable for modern use.
       

       
      The explore
       
      The Mill resides in pleasant surroundings with parts rented to a few small businesses including a quaint tea room... doing some rather unorthodox rambling to the bemusement of nearby dog walkers we eventually arrived at the Mill.  The Mill sits on top of a stream and in it's surrounding offers some peace from modern living. The exterior is generally in good condition with little sign of vandalism... The Mill stretches over some 4.04 hectares and took just over an hour to explore. Theres a few original features scattered around including some pretty heavy duty scales ... eleswhere empty rooms which bizarrely looked like they had just received their annual spring clean. looks like 'Love 37' and 'CarrotBoy' have done a few jobs here too.  
       
      The pics
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

×