Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Canonguy

(Ally Pally) The BBC Green room/s-Jan 2012

Recommended Posts

http://www.silentuk.com/?p=2703#more-2703

here is a brief history on ally pally but more can be found at:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexandra_Palace

Alexandra Palace is situated in North London and known around the world as the birthplace of television.

In fact it was never owned by the BBC, but in 1935 the Corporation leased the eastern part of the building from which the first public television transmissions were made. In 1936 it hosted trials between the EMI-Marconi and Baird television system to decide who would carry the television standard for the future.

Studio A was equipped with the Marconi-EMI Emitron system, while Baird installed his mechanical systems in Studio B. The Emitron camera proved far superior to Baird's cumbersome film technique, which never developed beyond an experimental stage.

These early transmissions were famously introduced by one of the very first presenters, Elizabeth Cowell, with the words "This is direct television from Alexandra Palace…"

From 1936 until the early 1950s, except during the Second World War, Alexandra Palace remained the major production centre for BBC television, broadcasting landmark programmes such as The Grove Family and historic events including the 1953 Coronation. After 1956 it was used exclusively for news broadcasts.

The BBC continued to produce television programmes at Alexandra Palace for the Open University until 1981 when the University moved out to purpose-built premises north of London in Milton Keynes.

7976973361_8dbfa9f5fd.jpg

7976965547_7c1f6e059f.jpg

pigeon sh*t everywhere luckly the builders have left this table for my bags :thumb

7977021362_4d17315490.jpg

these are the room the stars/guest would have stayed in each with there own log fire and butler

7977030582_144d11418f.jpg

some rooms are completely trashed

7976947861_2ea3848d6f.jpg

good place to watch a free concert/darts from :D

7976936815_e8d6d97f3e.jpg

wish i had my ladder :cry:

7976992517_9201714482.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By Nelly
      Not really derelict, but it was a quality mooch!!!
      _________________________________________________
      The General Cemetery of All Souls, Kensal Green, is one of England's oldest and most beautiful public burial grounds


      The plan for London's first garden cemetery was initiated by the barrister George Frederick Carden, who was inspired by a visit to Père-Lachaise in Paris in 1821. Alert both to the need for new burial grounds, and the commercial potential of the venture, Carden founded the General Cemetery Company in 1830, with influential supporters including Andrew Spottiswoode MP and the banker John Dean Paul of Rodburgh


      The cemetery was established by Act of Parliament which had its final reading in July 1832, during a cholera epidemic -- a coincidence that implicitly made the case for reform.


      The Bishop of London consecrated the first 48 acres in January 1833, and the first funeral was conducted a week later.




      From the funeral of HRH The Duke of Sussex in 1843 to that of his nephew HRH The Duke of Cambridge in 1904, Kensal Green was the most fashionable cemetery in England



      Its notable personalities include some 650 members of the titled nobility and over 550 individuals noted in the Dictionary of National Biography.



      Kensal Green is the resting place of the engineers Sir Marc Isambard Brunel and Isambard Kingdom Brunel, the mathematician Charles Babbage, and the novelists Wilkie Collins, Anthony Trollope and William Makepeace Thackeray; Lord Byron's wife, Oscar Wilde's mother, Charles Dickens' in-laws and Winston Churchill's daughter; a cross-dressing Army doctor and the surgeon who attended Nelson at Trafalgar; the creator of Pears' Soap, and the original WH Smith; the funambulist Blondin and the Savoyard George Grossmith; the first man to cross Australia from south to north, and the last man to fight a duel in England; the Duke's nephew who ruined the richest heiress of the day, and the English adventuress who became a French baronne disgraced by the accusation of murder.

      Kensal Green boasts some 140 Grade I, II* and II Listed buildings and monuments, including the magnificent Anglican Chapel (Top 2 pano's)



      The Cemetery is cared for by "The Friends of Kensal Green Cemetery" which is an independent registered charity






    • By chambre
      A holiday camp for children ("Colonia") somewhere in Italy. What appeared to be a grey, boring concrete building from the outside turned out to be colorful from the inside...
      #1

      #2

      #3

      #4

      #5

      #6

      #7

      #8

      For more, please visit my website: http://www.industriesafari.de/Viewer/Coloniaverde14/index.html
    • By Solidvortex


      A small, decaying prison. Meoww! WHAT IS!
      1

      2

      3

      4



    • By TheVampiricSquid


      Evening:D
      The Explore:
      Found myself up north this weekend, and the first place we visited was TG Green. After fighting through some brambles we found ourselves inside - it was a relativity relaxed explore overall, just wondering round at our leisure until we saw a jeep go by.. upstairs in the canteen, we saw it drive past again. security doing a patrol we thought? nope.. just a guy checking some animal traps, thankfully he was off as soon as he'd done that, and we slipped out the way we'd came with no bother at all. Loved this explore, had some amazing company and got some shots I'm reasonable happy with.
      History:
      Cornish Kitchen Ware was first produced in 1926 by T.G.Green & Co in Church Gresley, Derbyshire, a county famed for its pottery. The range’s special characteristic came from the lathe-turning process, which cut clean bands through its beautiful blue slip to show the white clay beneath. It was apparently this that inspired the name, since it reminded one T.G.Green & Co. employee of the clear blues and white-tipped waves of Cornwall. The range of kitchen and table ware, from the hooped plates to the iconic storage jars, was an immediate success and remained popular from then on. This inspired T.G.Green & Co. to produce more colours of Cornishware, and more ranges, including the spotted Domino Ware and the cream and green Streamline Ware. In the 1960s, Cornishware was updated by a young designer called Judith Onions. It says much for her skill and sensitivity that this restyled range was embraced as warmly as the originals had been. Over the past 20 years, the range has become highly prized by collectors, with the sighting of both rare original designs and Onions classics the subject of much excitement – and ever-increasing prices.
      The story was not so happy for T.G.Green & Co. itself, however. It had become increasingly difficult for the Victorian pottery in Derbyshire to compete in the modern age and, after a series of owners had done their best since the Green family sold it in 1964, it finally closed in 2007.
      Now, my flickr finally decided to work, so I can actually show y'all some pictures..











      Now, I must apologies for the quality of this - it's the only external I got, and it's from an iPhone, oops! I was sitting on a ledge, ready to drop out of the site and head home when I turned around and took one last look, camera was already packed away and I didn't want to leave without a memory of the exterior, so this will have to do!


    • By Perjury Saint


      After a bit of a lurk in the Jungle School, we popped down the road for a Sunday afternoon saunter around another abandoned Belgian school...



      ...The Green School...



      ...




      Thanks for lookin' in...

×