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Ninja Kitten

A day out at School...2012

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    • By Lament
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      Little house somewhere in Belgium. Seems there lived an 103 year old lady and after a fire on the upper floor she left the house. Her son still comes there every week to feed the cat.
    • By franconiangirl
      I have hardly any information about this former boarding school. Apparently it was an institute for boys only. The building is in a decaying state. Fortunately, the vandalism isn´t too bad so far. The size of this insitution almost kills you. It´s very emotional to explore this part of history, when obviously a stong religious belief was one of the most important parts of education. 

      As already mentioned above, this institution was huge. It´s picturesquely embedded between hills. It consisted not only of numerous dormitories and classrooms but its own chapel  and infirmary - with rusty bed frames and old medical stuff left behind - as well. You´ll find traces of religious importance again and again, for example old images of saints - to remind you over and over about the importance of a strong belief that was once an omnipresent theorem in this institution. Let the pictures speak for themselves. 


























       
    • By BadBatz
      Another one from our trip down South.
      More goodness revealed by SK!
      Here's some history.
      In 1864, Fr Herbert Vaughan, the later Cardinal Vaughan, gained approval to build a missionary seminary in England. On the 28th February 1871, after considerable difficulties had been overcome, the new seminary in Mill Hill, London, was built and occupied under the patrimony of St Joseph.
      Fr Vaughan's outstanding trust in St Joseph was thus rewarded. Mindful of St Joseph's finding of the stable for Mary when no other roof was to be found, Vaughan, on his first approach to the landowners of the new seminary, carried with him in a parcel a little statuette of St Joseph. When the landowner showed him the door after refusing Fr Vaughan's negotiations, Vaughan asked if he might leave the parcel in the house saying that he had some other business to attend to and he would collect it later in the day. When he returned, the landowner, Mr Druce, had changed his mind and the land was for sale.
      In 1871, this same statuette was solemnly installed in the simple little cloister of the seminary bearing the inscriptionOeconomus Domus Nostrae (Provider of our Home). The laying of the foundation stone of the seminary was a very public occasion on the 19th March 1871, the Feast of St Joseph, with the ceremony performed by Archbishop Manning. All that was required now was the funding to actually build and finish the church!
      The Holy Father had agreed that the Church would be the home of England's national shrine to St Joseph and fittingly, on the feast of St Joseph in 1873, the church was officially opened. The debts were finally paid off in March 1874, and the church was consecrated.
      By a special indult of Pope Pius IX, Cardinal Manning was permitted to crown the statue of St Joseph, which, with its altar, was declared the national shrine of Saint Joseph for England & Wales. This ceremony was performed in the presence of the hierarchy of England and Wales on 13th April 1874, and the statue became one of only a handful of crowned statues of St Joseph in the world.
      The once thriving English and European seminary of St Josephs in Mill Hill, has now given way to the reality that most of the Missionary Vocations are coming from Africa, only a few from England. The number of vocations from Africa is testimony to the great work and witness of the Mill Hill Missionary Fathers and the seminary of St Josephs. The Mill Hill site of St Joseph's closed on 1st July 2006. The new seminary of the Mill Hill fathers will be built where their vocations are strongest - in Africa.
      A big question mark hung over the shrine of St Joseph. The Mill Hill Fathers, eager to preserve their patrimony and to continue to foster devotion to the Patron not only of their order but also of the Church and of families, entrusted the shrine to the Benedictine monks of Farnborough. The shrine was transferred early in 2008 to the south transept of the Abbey Church where it continues to be a focus of devotion.

      Mint corridoors.

      And corners

      Chapel, used as a film set so repainted in places.

      Sun playing ball.

      Looking like I'm from an 80's electro band.....(Thanks SK)

      View from the top.

      Frontage.

      Rear view.
      Mint day all round!
    • By Gangeox
      Right people, it's back to school for you lot! luckily for the guy's it's a girls school!!
      The school was designed by J. M. Bottomley and G. T. Wellburn of Leeds and built in 1910. It was built in an Edwardian Baroque style, in an English cross bond utilising red brick and with white faience dressings.
      In 1971 the school amalgamated with Doncaster Grammar School and was renamed Hall Cross Comprehensive. The building here is the Waterdale location.












    • By Gangeox
      Moving on from my previous post here's another school
      Following the 1870 Education Act, the newly elected Sheffield School Board constructed 39 new schools in the city. Pye Bank School being one of them, designed by the architects Innocent and Brown and constructed in the 'English domestic gothic' style it was opened in 1875 and closed in 2003.













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