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Doug

Some clips from Doug in Australia

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Thanks for that :)

We recently had the Cave Clan Short Film Festival so I can post the few I was involved in soon.

Cheers

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Thanks for that :)

We recently had the Cave Clan Short Film Festival so I can post the few I was involved in soon.

Cheers

Nice one mate, I was watching cave clan vids years ago, always admired the stuff you guys do :)

Edited by Lenston

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Nice one mate, I was watching cave clan vids years ago, always admired the stuff you guys do :)

Thanks.

Well here's one that might lighten that feeling of admiration ;)

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Some other stuff from our visit to Adelaide.

 

I'm sure you've all experienced this...

 

The soundtrack on this one will make your ears bleed. Or you'll fall asleep.

 

A 30 second clip on the hazards of videoing people playing Pokémon in public.

You shall not pass...

 

I don't think anyone will handle a minute of this clip let alone 8 minutes :)

 

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