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Guest Scattergun

Polphail Ghost Village [Visited Nov 2012] - April 2013

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Guest Scattergun

Here's an arty farty vid I put together a few months ago of the abandoned village of Polphail on Scotlands west coast. Originally built in the mid 70's to house 500 oil workers for a nearby oil platform construction yard the village consisted of a series of 'flat pack' style accommodation units, bars, recreation rooms, canteen, bank, shops, laundry's and offices.

The yard was near completion in 1976 when the oil boom nosedived, by which time the village was already complete. The yard was scrapped having never received a single order and the unused village was never inhabited. It was abandoned completely in 1980 and finally demolished in 2013.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QESBGaTIeLY

Edited by Stussy

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Wow SG that certainly had me glued! A very interesting tale and a superbly put together clip. I love your use of slow moving filming - the keys swinging in the breeze is beautiful. Fantastic, thanks :thumb :thumb

Oh and what is the music? I love it, it's similar to the score on 'Lost' :)

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Guest Scattergun

Thank you star :) You're very welcome. I used to love visiting here. It was one of my early splores. Not much to it but always reminds me of when I was first starting out, which is kinda nice. This was one of my first vids and I've picked up a few handy filming tips along the way.

The soundtrack is actually from the video game Mass Effect 3. I do like the more epic soundtracks but in youtubes eyes at least, using game and film music doesn't appear to be such a heinous breach of copyright as using an actual artist :)

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That was rather splendid, I could emo my wrists up to that no problems! Stunning moving images, panos and other complicated words that i can use properly!

Well done chap, great work! :Devil:

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I really enjoyed this vid..I remember seeing pics from here many years back but this really captures the feel of it..cant have the sound on at the moment due Emmerdale being on!!!Wife will not like

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Guest Scattergun
I really enjoyed this vid..I remember seeing pics from here many years back but this really captures the feel of it..cant have the sound on at the moment due Emmerdale being on!!!Wife will not like

Much appreciated everyone :) Very ghostly feel the place had, especially when you're alone. Not to worry klemps mate. Could be worse, could be Eastenders ;)

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Guest Scattergun
Oh no, has this really gone now? Been meaning to pay it a visit for years.

I'm afraid so mate. The grounds were cleared back in November. Only take a few days to clear the site by my reckoning. Shame, always liked the place as my family live quite local.

Much appreciated shush :D

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