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Bankhead Academy, Aberdeen (Image Intensive) - April 2013

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Another solo adventure, also been putting this one off for way too long! Was planning on doing it last year, but a couple of serious fires put me off as the residents call the police instantly the someone in there. But on a return trip me and JFR went for a reccy in the dead of the night, and a returned the following day and braved it! Sadly missed what could have been a fantastic explore before the fires!

Bankhead Academy closed in 2009 after it was merged with Marpool Academy to form Bucksburn Academy in a new purpose built facility. The school was hit by 2 major fires, the last of which in June 2012, and is now currently being demolished by the Council.

Taking the same approach I did previously I didn't hang around outside taking externals incase I was spotted, so most of the pics are internals. First target was the older part of the building which is largely stripped out sadly!

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Small boiler room is largely intact strangely!

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The main staircase

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As you can tell all plaster has been stripped from the walls, but contractors have left a nice path to walk around.

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Very long corridor (not Nocton long but long enough)

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Looking towards the new block, as you can see there is a lot of rubble, as 2 buildings have already been KO'd and out for the count!

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Old Classroom, really derpy

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Old Dining Room / Assembly Room I think

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Gym Hall

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The next target, the newer block, weirdly shaped like a block of hexagonal cellular network - It was the science and crafts block.

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Pic I found on the wall.

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Inside its clear they have been loading up the left over items for recycling / salvage.

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Pottery Kilns

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Even found loads of kids pottery!

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Boring Stairs

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Jackass would love this!

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Desh in the classroom

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Chair shot!!

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Top floor is now stripped :(

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Lets head for the roof!

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Was a bit to early in the night to get too close to the edge :(

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If you got this far, congratulations for putting up with my derp zone!

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Nice one!! I love the kids pottery bits and such a shame they got left behind. Really enjoyed that, thanks :jump

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  • Similar Content

    • By LewisS
      How do lads and lasses.
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      The Preston and Longridge Railway (P&LR) was a branch line in Lancashire, England. Originally designed to carry quarried stone in horse-drawn wagons, it became part of an ambitious plan to link the Lancashire coast to the heart of Yorkshire. The plan failed, and the line closed to passengers in 1930 and to goods in 1967.
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      In 1850, a double-track extension was built connecting to the existing line a few hundred yards east of the Deepdale Street terminus. The line passed via the 862-yard (788 m) Miley Tunnel under the north part of Preston and connected to the Preston and Wyre Joint Railway very close to that line’s original terminus at Maudlands. The extension was initially used for goods only.
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    • By sonyes


      I'm sure you're all familiar with the history of this place, so I won't bore you with it.




      Our trip





      Explored with _Nyx_
      This was a bit of a last minute decision to go here, having planned on doing a mill and what a good decision it turned out to be. Loved the place!!! Initially I was a little bit disappointed, having entered the building and immediately being faced with locked doors to the 'mural corridor' however, we eventually found another access point to finally see it......and boy was it worth it
      Anyway, this, for me was the highlight of the place, although there were several other excellent bits, namely the Theatre, tower and main hall.
      I hope I've done the old girl justice, as she deserves to be seen......the 'Moor' the merrier




      The pics, and there are a few



      A different view
















      And just a few of the Murals




      Well i hope you enjoyed the show, that's if you made it this far!



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