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The Urban Adventurer

A D House - a little gem on the south coast (Pic Heavy) (Visited Sept 2012)

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Luckily this place has been saved..unlucky for us urbex folk..it’s undergoing full renovation now..

Some minor HDR on these pics..so if that offends please don’t look…

I’ve lived round these parts most of my life..I’ve walked past this place so many times and never realised that it was abandoned..guess I should have gone to Specsavers !

It was built by a very prominent Dover man around the beginning of the 1900’s and designed by a leading architect of that day who went onto design the Garrick Club in London. As you can see there are some heavy Art Deco influences in the detailing.

The views are one of the best on this part of the coast and it still amazes me why anyone would let this house fall into such a bad state of repair.

Not sure how many of you have found a full size snooker table whilst out exploring..this really blew me away..the snooker table was made by one of the UK’s leading makers, their snooker tables graced the rooms of many a fine country house!

My favourite place was the green bathroom..almost intact after all this time. Solid cast iron as well that bath..I’m not kidding !

During the 1960’s / 1970’s is was some form of nursing home..all they did was stick gas fires in front of all the beautiful fireplaces and boxed in the detailing..

The sun room was also stunning with its patterned glass roof and commanded amazing views over the English Channel.


The House on the hill..


Game of snooker anyone..


Bath time..


The Sun room..the view and roof were very cool!


Wicked curtains...wicked view..


Not sure what this is...the wife informs me that it is some sort of washing machine..way beyond me..


Nature on the attack


External view of the sun room..


The safe was empty...


Nature on the inside..


What was left of the kitchen..


entrance to the sun room..


The sun room ceiling..


The view from the terrace


Cast iron fire detail


A classic gas fire..


I'm told this is a cooker ?


This safe was hidden behind a wooden panel


Nature trying to get in..


Nothing like a good knob !


A little bit of stained glass.

Thanks for looking, got hundreds more pics of this place...don't want to bore you all..in a way I'm glad it is one place that is being saved !

Edited by Nelly

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Guest Scattergun

Ace close ups :) I love the detail. That snooker tables pretty impressive too! Great set.

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That is A-MA-ZING!! Loving the sun room and all the little details, but all of it is lovely and you have captured it well. Thanks for sharing :jump

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Yet another cracking write up and pics.:D

So glad to hear the place is being renovated as looks lovely as does the surrounding location.

Quality share thank you


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Guest Dubbednavigator

Awesome stuff, be a great holiday home on that hill if it were done up

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Thats quality mate, what was that cooker thing you were going on about? I got some up in Google images but I don't recognise them?

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HDR is spot on for me, great detail shots! The Tumble drier is very cool :D

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