Jump to content
mookster

The Ordinary House... (July 2012) 2013

Recommended Posts

...in an ordinary street in an ordinary city.

Driving past this you'd never know it was empty, sure the front garden could do with a trim but to all intents and purposes it looks just like any sizeable late Victorian or Edwardian townhouse, in an affluent area of the country. It is surprising to hear then that this house has lain empty and uninhabited since 1995, and amazing it was left sitting in this condition. It first popped up on the radar a year or so before my visit and I assumed it was long cleared and sold on, but a message from a Facebook contact told me to get my arse up there as it was still around. So me and Gigi Soden duly made the trip, and it was every bit as special as I was expecting. Just proves you don't need to travel to Belgium to find epic houses!

7625035734_ff2746f3f6_c.jpg

7625035048_a27c0a5fa8_c.jpg

7625030182_335cc0c02c_c.jpg

7625027738_8c8e5e92b8_c.jpg

7625024640_c860340a24_c.jpg

7625020756_04f63aec01_c.jpg

7625019372_e22df75bb3_c.jpg

7625014274_28246f481f_c.jpg

7625013672_da6f74d379_c.jpg

7625012784_4d5219e7d7_c.jpg

7625009262_dba40bbbd7_c.jpg

7625003424_08c36fea40_c.jpg

7625002454_1eb9cff7e9_c.jpg

7625059896_11dc0aec5b_c.jpg

This is only a small selection of photos from the place, loads more here http://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157630701612596/ :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Scattergun

Like they've all just died yesterday! Bloody nice find Mooks. Looks like my house.. :-|

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thats one really nice place, no one would ever know its been empty that long.

Really good pictures Mooks, thanks for sharing

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

  • Similar Content

    • By crabb
      With a 2.5 meter high, fully reinforced security fence, cameras at every angle and motion sensors tucked away in strategical places, this building was designed to keep people out.
      A load of good that did, eh? 
      This building is shrouded in mystery, its former use was totally unknown and even google wasn't any help! Turns out it was the old headquarters for the Department of work and pensions, but they could not afford to keep it running, so became a rejected building for social security. No one has ever documented this building and not a single photo of the insides can be found.. Until now. 
      Not my fanciest of camera work but the night time was the best time for this trip. So granted the shots could be better but with not a lot of time on our hands (and maybe setting a motion detector off) we had to make do! 
      The building itself was actually very clean and tidy, in and out. Fair bit of dust and clutter from the stripping off pipes from underneath the flooring but no graffiti, no vandalism.. Not a single sign of "outsiders". 
      Truly trapped in time with 1990's tech scattered, but nothing of worth, just old school things that required Ethernet and a few tapes and old floppy disks.
      For the most part it was quiet and things were calm, the main worry was watching for the missing floor panels and pesky motion sensors above a certain few doors. So I gather most office blocks like this are still protected (A company called 'clear way') which is kind of surprising considering how long it has been abandoned and I cannot find out anything to do with that buildings future. 
      Originally used as a primary headquarters for the department of work and pensions, handling data and dealing with data to do with peoples income and possibly entitlement of benefits, sits unused and had been abandoned between around 2002 but the exact time is yet to be known.
      It was being used through the 90's that's for sure with lift service sheets with the last service being 2002 and floppy disks and tapes dating through the 90's.
      It is unfortunate we could not see the whole building, as out of the three floors it had only the ground and second were explored. The lower ground floor proved to be a challenge as that's were the sensors really were, so we decided to leave it and head out quiet as a mouse. But not without having one last look at the glass atrium of course. 
      Over all this building is still somewhat a mystery and i'm fairly certain we are the only people to document this building, which is mad for me.
      This is my first real forum and I hope you enjoy the photos,
      Til the next one!
      "Take nothing but photos, leave nothing but footprints"
       
       
      1. scouting a way in

      2. The atrium, looking straight through

      3. 

      4.

      5. This tells me they were short of funds.

      6.

      7. The windows for the atrium

      8. Lift mechanics

      9. The lift motor and pulley system

      10. Service history for the lift

      11.  A letter (with buildings address) for evaluation of the one lift

      12. Typical office corridors, minus the health and safety hazard

      13. Vintage mounted desk with plug sockets built in

      14. Huge computer room

      15. Keys still left as they were since closure

      16. Media storage units

      16. Hand drawn schematics for lift dated 89

      17. Lift room

      18. Temperature gauges

      19. Wiring for the lift

      20. Very rusty keys

      21. The motor for the lift

      22. Lift schematics 

      23. The original blueprint before the construction of oak house

      24. This still works! 

      25. Flooring lifted for strip down before being abandoned

      26. Old school floppy disk dated 91

      27. Media room and units

      28. Stannah lift lever

      29. Inside the vast atrium

      30. Another angle 

      31. Vintage clock and safe

    • By little_boy_explores
      History
       
      Officially opened by the Earl of Scarborough in 1957, it was built the year before for £350,000 as headquarters for Leeds chemicals and dyestuffs firm Brotherton and Co and was at the heart of a new business area at the Westgate end of The Headrow. It was named in recognition of the famous Leeds city benefactor family, after the Brotherton Library and Collection at Leeds University, the Charles Brotherton engineering and chemical laboratory, the Brotherton Wing at the Leeds General Infirmary and the Brotherton Charity Trust.

      It was dubbed as the design of the future with the “latest external and internal structural techniques, automatic ventilation and ceiling heating”. Its ceilings were reported to be “acoustically perfect”, and its floors covered in highly-polished parquet. It was in 1965 – long before the merging of local police forces and the establishment of the current West Yorkshire force, that the old Leeds City Police took over part of the building and ultimately established its administrative headquarters there.

      In addition to the then Chief Constable and his Assistant Chief, numerous other police departments have been based at Brotherton House over the decades including senior CID, Special Branch, Fraud Squad, Regional Crime Squad, Firearms Registry, Aliens Department, Force Prosecutions, Special Constabulary, Training, Photographic and Fingerprint departments, the then so-called Policewomen’s Department, Pay and Accounts. Most notable investigations to have been carried out at Brotherton house was the notorious "Ripper squad" which was applied to a group of investigators and was the term used by the media for the investigation into the Yorkshire Ripper murders. Including George Oldfield the man in charge of the investigation. Today, the building – which has largely been vacated – overlooks the Leeds Inner Ring Road and is described by its agents as a “substantial high-profile office building with a significant presence.”
       
      Explore
       
      A day out in Leeds, driving on the ring road I noticed a building covered in green fabric... on closer inspection we found out by locals telling us that the building was abandon. Mostly the building is in good condition with a large amount of original features untouched.. the main hall is really something with original parquet flooring and a grand stair case leading into the main building. Corridors lead to open staircases on both sides of the building which offer access to the buildings six floors including rooftop.
       
      Pics
       
      1.

       
      2.

       
      3.

       
      4.

       
      5.

       
      6.

       
      7.

       
      8.

       
      9.

       
      10.

       
      11. and 12
       
       
      13.

       
      14.

       
      15.

       
      16. and 17.
       
       
      LE FIN
    • By oldskool
      A revisit @ The Christallerie didnt have much time first visit .........
      1.

      2.

      3.

      4.

      5.

      6.

      7.

      8.

      9.

      10.

      11.

      If anyone can tell what the House Of Esher was going to be i would love to know visited with Critical Mass & Host
      12.

      13.

      14.

      15.

      16.

      17.

      Cheers for looking Oldskool .........
    • By Ghost
      This is a sad little house with a sad history of loneliness and death in a fire, it is of no great size but contains the remnants of a life and is now gradually being overgrown by nature with an unclear future.



















    • By Perjury Saint
      Hide n Seek House (aka Red Dress Manor/Farmer Johns)
      Another stop off on me n NKs summer splore tour... IT WAS BOSS!!!
      So much stuff left behind!! Hard to fathom why anybody would just board a place up like this and walk away...









      Thanks for lookin'
×