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    • By he who must rome
      Well a quick trip but don't know what to make of the building !, old big house, mansion or poss small old nursing home !!!!! no history to be found even off the old drunk outside the bath hotel pub ! it's in the early stages of re development so on with the pic's

















    • By evo_mad
      CS, RD and Hood_Mad had been the week before and I'd been badgering Hood all week to go and he finally succumbed. On this explore was Hood_mad, Bone_mad and myself.
      We first went to see 8X7, which is a fantastic experience, we followed the tunnel, past some spectacular collapses (deliberate???) right to the end to where the tunnel has been concreted shut, if you're really quiet here, you can hear running water below your feet.
      All the way along the tunnels, there are these fantastic stalagmites and stalactites,



      Most of the side tunnels have (been) collapsed and the concrete roof has fallen down blocking the entrances, there are two open ones near the beginning of 8X7 but they don't look far off collapsing.
      All around the place, there are pieces of the steel supporting hoops which are about 1" thick girders that supported the roof structure, these have been broken (blown) into pieces by some force. The edges are slightly molten.


      Everywhere we went, Bone_mad was there, she was exploring every nook and cranny, loving every minute. No puddle was too deep, no wall too high.

      We then moved onto 8X6, which had a smaller entrance, we had to get a picture of the fake appendage mentioned in the other threads, CS, look away now or you'll have nightmares!!

      Scattered around the place were these fantastic heavy duty lamps.

      And the switchwork.

      We were very hesitant about going right to the bottom of this tunnel as there were significant collapses of the side walls and of the link tunnels, but as always, a bit of taunting put our balls in the right place and we (very quietly) made our way to the far end. Nothing makes you place your feet carefully as the threat of imminent collapse.
      At the end of this tunnel, there is a lot of running water passing below your feet, it is quite loud. We obviously didn't spend long down here, but on the way back, we spotted this set of rollers that would have been along the tunnel for pushing boxes down.

      We made our way a bit further up the tunnel and spotted a ladder going up one of the collapsed side tunnel roofs.
      I squeezed my way up and on top of the tunnel, either side of the entrance was a ladder that went down between the double skins.

      There was enough headroom for me to crouch and walk all the way along the top of the tunnel to the other side which was the right-hand tunnel of 8X6. I saw significant collapses on this side and was not about to venture there.
      We made our way out of the tunnel through the gap.

      We had a quick peek in 8X5 as I wanted to go see the other bunkers.
      We walked up to the north west one (scared the life out of some teenage dopeheads) and had a look around.

      Past some guard huts.

      Then to the middle (secured) one.

      The old alarm system.

      The new alarm system.


      In all the excitement, I forgot to take a full photo of this one, we walked all the way over the top of it, there is definately no other way in, lol.
      It was getting dark by now so we made our way home.
      J.
    • By Maniac
      I wanted to go here more for personal reasons than anything else. My mum grew up in Chelmsford, and she and her mum and a lot of their friends all worked for Marconi at different times.
      Well what can I say it sure is a mess - pikeys and graffiti artists have been at play here. Having said that if you move away from the factory floor areas and into the other areas, it's not actually too bad. It's totally stripped, hardly anything to show what it's purpose was which is a shame.
      Also it's huge - it really is a pretty big site, you don't realise until you're inside. There must be 4 very large factory floors, with several other large spaces as well as a 5 story high admin block, which although very samey does get better as you go higher. Then there's the very oldest part right at the front.
      Visited on the spur of the moment with Obscurity and his misses - cheers for a good day people

      It has to be said, this bit's pretty bland


      Amazingly all the glass is intact, but the ceilings trashed.

      Old meets new


      There's a few bits left


      I love the roof of this building.



      Reception area was pretty good, shame it's no where near as neat as it was in earlier reports, but it could be worse.





      The main lobby of the oldest part.



      Although it was trashed in parts, I thought it was a pretty good - it would have been fantastic to have seen it in it's prime.
      Maniac.
    • By Lavino
      visited st josephs myself woopashoopaa and gronk this was our first stop of the day after we gained access we found it was now being inhabited by pidgeons and there was shit everywhere. the church and been pretty much stripped but was still worth a look. as the place hasnt been covered that much.just as we had left and crossed the road taking our externals the police turned up so made our escape to our next place so heres bit of history i found and a few pictures
      In October 1870, Father Henry J Lamon (see "St. Joseph's Clergy") was appointed head of the new mission that would soon become the Parish of St. Joseph, Wigan, and it was due to the untiring zeal and great energy of the new Rector that rapid progress was made.
      The first service was held on 22nd January, 1871, in a small chapel that formerly belonged to the Primitive Methodist Body, in Caroline Street, but in a very short time the building was found to be too small for the increasing numbers of Catholics living in the surrounding Wallgate area.
      Consequently, with the permission of the Right Reverend Doctor O'Reilly, Bishop of Liverpool, Father Lamon purchased some adjoining land to the chapel, at a cost of £500. The old Methodist chapel was then pulled down, and on the site was erected the first church of St. Joseph, which opened in April 1872. This new church was built to accommodate between 500 and 600 worshippers at a cost of £3,000 - a considerable sum at the time.
      At a further cost of £5,000, through the support of his faithful parishioners, by 1874, Father Lamon had built the schools at St. Joseph's, which soon had an average attendance of over 800 scholars!
      However, it soon became evident that the new church was totally inadequate for the requirements of the district, and steps were taken without delay for the erection of a more extensive building.
      NOTE: During his time at St. Joseph's, there was frequent correspondence between Father Lamon and the Bishop of Liverpool, regarding the possible acquisition of land around Caroline Street. Indeed, some of Father Lamon's letters to the Bishop, which are kept in the Archdiocesan Archives, suggest that the first Rector of St. Joseph's was most shrewd and business-like when dealing in such matters
      In due course, more land adjacent to the church was purchased, and the old premises were removed to make room for the building of a second new church!
      The design of the new St. Joseph's Church, the one that so many came to know and love, was entrusted to Mr. Goldie, of the firm of Messrs. Goldie and Child, of Kensington, London, and the contract, which amounted to about £6,000, to Mr. J. Wilson, of Wigan, with Mr. Weatherby acting as clerk of works. In 1877, the foundation stone was laid and blessed by the Right Rev. Dr. O'Reilly, and, together, with the adjoining Presbytery for the accommodation of three priests, the church was completed in 1878 and opened on Sunday, 30th June of that year.







      P



    • By Urbexbandoned
      So I had been told about this little school up north a while back and recently had the pleasure of visiting it.
      Split in to 2 sections, one for the girls and one for the boys with a great big wall down the middle I can only assume that being a schoolchild here and meeting a child of the opposite sex was like being like a kid in a sweetshop. It was infact an Infants school so probably didn't have my mindset
      Access was pretty easy, made our way in to the Girls side first and was a good job we were with it as there were no floors, we initially thought we were too late. We clambered over beams and made our way upstairs to have a look about, a few little bits to see but not much really. Conversion had begun.
      Came back down, went to the boys section again access was relatively easy, having a wander about and was pleasantly surprised.
      Whilst the girls side was in the state it was, this side was aside from other urbexers and vandals not too bad. Lots to see so out came the camera!
      The reason I called it Pigeon Street School is because I have literally never seen so much Pigeon shit in my life! This was no longer a resting place, it was a bloody hotel for the feathered rats!! Everywhere I leant, everything I touched it was Pigeon! I was covered in the shit, literally! But, Pigeons aside it was a good explore and there was lots to see. I have since been told it is undergoing complete restoration so relatively lucky with timing.
      Sorry if it's a bit pic heavy!
      Class room

      This room, well I absolutely loved it! The decay, the colours, the single chair. I must have spent a good 20 minutes alone in this room.

      I am pleased to say that I can read and know what these things are. A brief visit back to education taught me well.

      One of the corridors, lovely circular skylights beaming light in and on the floor is the toilet for pigeons!

      She wasn't in Class today! School's out!

      Where the pigeons hang their bags

      Reading time

      I got quite excited when I see these, I used to use them at school. I know.... easily pleased right!

      Another shot of that beautiful room

      Don't ask.... I just thought it looked cool!

      Another Corridor

      Residents

      One side of the school, Boys.

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