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Ninja Kitten

"Its Curtain time" NKPS present to you... Theatre Royal..may 2013

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4am and my alarms screaming " its splore time " whooooop!! its the only time i ever manage to fall out of bed smiling

:P we were both like excited school kids on this one and she did not dissapoint us...however the entry was one unlike we have never come across before...:o never before have i ever had to strip off and squeeze backwards through a gap our bags only just fit through, to be confronted by ice cold water you then have to plunge into up to your waist and try to negotiate floating chairs and beer crates in order to avoid hypothermia and reach dry land! it just gets better!! the place is simply beautiful and although work has started she had so many lovely features left...A true little gem this one...Splored as always with my partner in crime PS.. top one tink! on with the pics...PS will follow with him...

Theatre Royal...............

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QUICK YOUR ON...GET BACK IN!!!

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Edited by skeleton key

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Hilarious access... Amazing interior... Ace company! All in all a fantastic mooch!! Heres my pix...

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Matinee time...

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​Cheers for lookin' :D

Edited by Perjury Saint

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Guest Scattergun

Simply outstanding! :D That's all I've got, I hope it's enough!

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Cracking set of pics you pair, this does look absolutely amazing! Top notch sploring skills :P

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      First things first - this place is a death-trap. Simple as that. And it's quite likely to be worse now than it was when I went. But as I have a bit of an obsession about redundant old cinemas and theatres I left all common sense at the entrance.
       
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