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  • Similar Content

    • By Laura
      Hey guys! I’m Laura and I’m from New York. I’m a musician, artist and history geek. I’ve loved abandoned buildings for as long as I can remember. The mysterious feel they give, their backstories, it’s all incredible. They’re like time machines into our past. 
    • By Desert
      Hey guys i am new here i am so glad i found this site i been looking for a cool place to share some cool photography i have taken and maybe find some cool locations to go to vacant places i am from Pennsylvania if you know any cool spots please let me know would love to go check them out in the Pennsylvania area
    • By urbex13



      The History

      Largely from wiki: Millmoor was was the home ground of Rotherham County F.C. between 1907 and 1925 and then their successors Rotherham United F.C. until 2008. The team and ground were once owned by C.F. Booth, whose huge Clarence Metalworks and scrapyard overlooks the site. When Ken Booth sold the club in 2004 he kept the freehold to the stadium and leased it back to the club in return for £200,000 a year rent and preferential advertising options and ticket allocations. In 2008 the relationship between the two parties broke down and Rotherham United left Millmoor for the Don Valley Stadium, before moving into their present ground, the New York Stadium, in 2012. 


      The Explore
       

      All in all a pretty relaxed mooch. The scrapyard next door is huge and noisy but everybody is too busy to be paying much attention to the stadium. All of the internal areas of the ground are heavily stripped but in good condition, with the custody suite and cells being particularly interesting. The stands are in fairly good condition and the pitch itself appears to be maintained with Wiki suggesting it's seen periodic use for youth football. Being the genius that I am I left everything but a 35mm prime lens at home and arrived about 40 minutes before sunset so apologies for the slightly odd perspectives.


      The Photos


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      If you're anywhere vaguely near Sheffield and want to link up then drop me a line.

      Cheers, 

      Thirteen. 


    • By urbex13
      History

      Going to be brief as this is everywhere, I'd recommend rafchurchfenton.org.uk if you're looking for a solid reference on the subject. RAF Church Fenton was opened in 1937, during WWII it had a defensive role protecting the northern Industrial cities from bombing raids. It also hosted the first American volunteer 'Eagle Squadron' during this period. 

      Much of its postwar history was dominated by an emphasis on its role as a training airfield and from 1998 to 2003 Church Fenton was the RAF's main Elementary Flying Training airfield. On 25 March 2013 it was announced that Church Fenton would close by the end of the year. The site was bought by a local entrepreneur in late 2014 and the airfield now caters for private flights, having been renamed Leeds East Airport. 

       
      The Explore

      Not much to say here. There's a bit of building going on on some adjacent land, whether this means the airfield owner has more significant plans for the derelict portion of the site I have no idea. All in all despite lots of talk of run-ins with police and security it was a very relaxed mooch, albeit slightly disorientating at points with the overgrown and repetitive nature of everything. There's not a great deal in the way of ephemera or artefacts, just lots of peely paint, first-floor ferns and other fairly natural pretty decay. By and large aside from some new (crap) graffiti very little changed between my visits.


      The Pictures

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      Thanks for looking.

      If you're anywhere vaguely near Sheffield and want to link up then drop me a line.

      Cheers, 

      Thirteen. 
       
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