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  • Similar Content

    • By chris banks
      I have found a location close to me in West Yorkshire that has been covered before, the site is nearly completely destroyed but the main barn and some of the out buildings still exist. 
      I enjoyed looking around the site and turning it into a cinematic style video (i hope i aren't hated for it, my last video i posted on here went down well).
      Let me know what you think of the video.
    • By Laura
      Hey guys! I’m Laura and I’m from New York. I’m a musician, artist and history geek. I’ve loved abandoned buildings for as long as I can remember. The mysterious feel they give, their backstories, it’s all incredible. They’re like time machines into our past. 
    • By Desert
      Hey guys i am new here i am so glad i found this site i been looking for a cool place to share some cool photography i have taken and maybe find some cool locations to go to vacant places i am from Pennsylvania if you know any cool spots please let me know would love to go check them out in the Pennsylvania area
    • By urbex13

      The History

      Largely from wiki: Millmoor was was the home ground of Rotherham County F.C. between 1907 and 1925 and then their successors Rotherham United F.C. until 2008. The team and ground were once owned by C.F. Booth, whose huge Clarence Metalworks and scrapyard overlooks the site. When Ken Booth sold the club in 2004 he kept the freehold to the stadium and leased it back to the club in return for £200,000 a year rent and preferential advertising options and ticket allocations. In 2008 the relationship between the two parties broke down and Rotherham United left Millmoor for the Don Valley Stadium, before moving into their present ground, the New York Stadium, in 2012. 

      The Explore

      All in all a pretty relaxed mooch. The scrapyard next door is huge and noisy but everybody is too busy to be paying much attention to the stadium. All of the internal areas of the ground are heavily stripped but in good condition, with the custody suite and cells being particularly interesting. The stands are in fairly good condition and the pitch itself appears to be maintained with Wiki suggesting it's seen periodic use for youth football. Being the genius that I am I left everything but a 35mm prime lens at home and arrived about 40 minutes before sunset so apologies for the slightly odd perspectives.

      The Photos












      If you're anywhere vaguely near Sheffield and want to link up then drop me a line.