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  • Similar Content

    • By urbex13
      History

      Going to be brief as this is everywhere, I'd recommend rafchurchfenton.org.uk if you're looking for a solid reference on the subject. RAF Church Fenton was opened in 1937, during WWII it had a defensive role protecting the northern Industrial cities from bombing raids. It also hosted the first American volunteer 'Eagle Squadron' during this period. 

      Much of its postwar history was dominated by an emphasis on its role as a training airfield and from 1998 to 2003 Church Fenton was the RAF's main Elementary Flying Training airfield. On 25 March 2013 it was announced that Church Fenton would close by the end of the year. The site was bought by a local entrepreneur in late 2014 and the airfield now caters for private flights, having been renamed Leeds East Airport. 

       
      The Explore

      Not much to say here. There's a bit of building going on on some adjacent land, whether this means the airfield owner has more significant plans for the derelict portion of the site I have no idea. All in all despite lots of talk of run-ins with police and security it was a very relaxed mooch, albeit slightly disorientating at points with the overgrown and repetitive nature of everything. There's not a great deal in the way of ephemera or artefacts, just lots of peely paint, first-floor ferns and other fairly natural pretty decay. By and large aside from some new (crap) graffiti very little changed between my visits.


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      Thanks for looking.

      If you're anywhere vaguely near Sheffield and want to link up then drop me a line.

      Cheers, 

      Thirteen. 
       
    • By hamtagger
      On the news this morning. New Adler Hey Children's Hospital to open shortly leaving the old one in the Springfield park area empty and awaiting demo next year
      http://www.liverpoolecho.co.uk/news/liverpool-news/new-alder-hey-what-happens-10160093
    • By Timeless Seeker
      Hey guys, I`m new here.
      Already been in the Facebook-group for some time and now joined this forum
      I am 19 y/o, live near Munich in southern Germany and study Architecture.
      I do photography as a hobby since one year now and like decayed buildings best!
      Maybe some of you know me from Flickr or Facebook already, hope to see some known faces and of course new, too
      Here you can find my photos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/timelessseeker/
      Cheers! Peter
    • By Hydro


      No history unfortunately, and it will soon be luxury apartments
      Narrowly avoiding death with Raz, Jamie_P & Rott3nWood.
      The Explore;
      So we went for a look at the Conditioning House but other than teleportation i couldnt see a way in. So not worth traversing a wall with concreted glass on the top and a gate covered in Razor Wire... Still always come out with a positive right so going with that frame of mind, if i'd have slipped i'd have received ghetto acupuncture free of charge - Sweet
      So over the road we went and after crossing the needle forrest (Not nice pine needles if you catch my drift) we had a look around this place.
      Nothing spectacular and not really worth the risk of aids or being mauled by the dogs loose in the building or even the dodgey as fook floors but i still managed to chuck together a decent amount of photos;





      Thanks for looking

    • By Hydro


      Explored with Rott3nW00d & Raz;
      So the last report was killing me as there wasn't one single decent photo out of the lot... So we went for a revisit


      History;
      Firbeck Hall was formerly the home of 19th-century architect and writer Henry Gally Knight who is assumed to have been a principal information source for Walter Scott during the writing of Ivanhoe. Firbeck Hall was built in 1594 by William West, who made a fortune practising law and serving as an associate to Gilbert Talbot, 7th Earl of Shrewsbury from 1580 to 1594. West was the author of a legal textbook called Symbolaeographia. In his will of 1598, West stipulated that "a grave stone be set for me and my said wife in Firbeck Church, and ingraven with our arms and names and some posy."

      Country Club
      In 1935 a Sheffield stockbroker, Cyril Nicholson, opened the hall as a country club, investing £80,000 in its renovation. The interior was dramatically modernised and featured a mirror-walled ballroom and an elaborate and versatile state-of-the-art lighting system. There was also a heated outdoor swimming pool. Membership fees ranged from three to seven guineas, and the club was patronised by the likes of Amy Johnson and the then Prince of Wales. Such was the reputation of the club, that the BBC transmitted its weekly Saturday show "Late Night Dance Music" with Henry Hall, Carroll Gibbons and Charlie Kunz from Firbeck.

      Second World War – present day
      At the outbreak of the Second World War, the hall was used by Sheffield Royal Infirmary and the Royal Air Force, with the adjacent aerodrome becoming RAF Firbeck. After the War, the building was bought by the Miners Welfare Commission for use as a rehabilitation centre for injured miners. This centre closed in 1984. It was purchased by Cambridge Construction. From then the Hall fell into a state of disrepair.


      The Explore;
      As mentioned above i have recently posted a report on this location but the photos and quality were dire. So off we went for another look.
      1 year had passed since our last visit and if the place was knackered before its even worse now!! floors that were safe last time have collapsed, some of the doors were bearing the full weight of the wall/house above them and if you tried to move quickly anywhere you were pretty likely to be seriously injured if not worse. All the upstairs in now pretty much unaccessable unless you have a death wish so we missed out on one of the best stair cases i've seen

      All in all this place will soon not need to be knocked down as it will have fallen down of its own accord and if you do go, the swimming pool is the best bit by far
      Photos;






      Wrote my page name on this plate on my last visit




      Spent about 45 mins playing with long exposure at the end - brilliant fun

      If you got this far, thanks for looking

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