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Nelly

UK St Helens Church, Biscathorpe, Lincolnshire - June 2013

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St Helens is a Grade 2 listed Anglican church just outside the village of Biscathorpe

The Church was built in 1847 and restored in 1913

The last mention of the church being active that I can find is the online parish records that mentions the Banns Book that finished in 1969

Seats 60

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Edited by skeleton key

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Great set mate.. cant beat a nice church, really well captured.

Glad your visit was event free, I was almost bummed by muddy Labrador that galloped in whilst I was extending my tripod (matron!)

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Great set mate.. cant beat a nice church, really well captured.

Glad your visit was event free, I was almost bummed by muddy Labrador that galloped in whilst I was extending my tripod (matron!)

Christ!!! I normally have to pay 50 quid for that!!

:thumb

Edited by Nelly

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