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George Barnsley & Sons ( Cornish Works ), Sheffield - July 2013

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Be gentle, this is my first report ! lol

Visited with urban witness, urban sentry & urban tempest

After seeing a lot of reports for this place i had wanted to visit it for a while, all i can say it was worth the wait. The only downside is one of us ( me ) forgot spare camera batteries :mad:. All that means is a re visit is on the cards asap to get the shots i missed .

History stolen from Lowry Jen's report :confused

History:

George Barnsley and Sons Ltd. (founded 1836) They were in Cornish Place on the Don and specialised in forge filing and cutting tools for leather workers and shoe makers. One George Barnsley was Master Cutler in 1883.

George Barnsley and Son is listed in the 1837 Sheffield directory as a file manufacture situated on Wheeldon Street, The 1849 listing records a move to Cornhill and the 1852 to Cornish works Cornish street they had by this time also increased there product range to include steel files, shoe and butchers knives.

They are again listed in 1944 as manufactures of files and blades shoe knives and leather workers tools.

In the 1948 listing the business had become George Barnsley and Son Ltd George Barnsley died at his home at No 30 Collegiate Crescent on 30th March 1958, he lived there with his wife Mabel and mother-in-law Elizabeth. He was a partner in the firm which were steel and file manufacturers and the business was converted into a limited company about 10 years before his death.

The building finally closed in 2004 and has been left abandoned ever since.

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Edited by Wevsky
Just removed some spare html that had crept in :)

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