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Thought it might be fun to start this thread... Fantasy Urbex...

What would be your ultimate fictional mooching site? It could be anything at all as long as it doesnt really exist, with a couple of pix of course.

I'll kick things off with JF Sebastians apartment in Blade Runner...

(Mods, please feel free to bin this if you think its a bit stoopid)



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