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Sheffield General Cemetery august 2013

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Sheffield General Cemetery

I was in Sheffield and my friend wanted to show me this cemetery so we went and had a look and i must say i really enjoyed walking around even got inside the chapel bonus :). I like the history of this place too and enjoyed doing the research here is a few photos i took and some history i got on it. the first pic isnt mine.

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The General Cemetery was one of the first commercial landscape cemeteries in Britain. Its opening in 1836 as a Nonconformist cemetery was a response to the rapid growth of Sheffield and the relatively poor state of the town's churchyards. The cemetery, with its Greek Doric and Egyptian style buildings, was designed by Sheffield architect Samuel Worth (1779–1870) on the site of a former quarry.[4] Landscaping was managed by Robert Marnock, who also designed Sheffield Botanical Gardens (1836) and Weston Park (1873). The first burial was of Mary Ann Fish, a victim of tuberculosis. An Anglican cemetery was consecrated alongside the Nonconformist cemetery in 1846â€â€the wall that divided the un-consecrated and consecrated ground can still be seen today. By 1916 the cemetery was rapidly filling up and running out of space, burials in family plots continued through the 1950s and 1960s, but by 1978 ownership of the cemetery had passed to Sheffield City Council and it was closed to all new burials. In 1980 the council got permission by Act of Parliament to clear 800 gravestones to make a recreation area. Through the 1980s and 1990s most of the rest of the cemetery was left untouched, becoming overgrown and an important sanctuary for local wildlife. Unfortunately, many of the buildings also fell into disrepair. In early 2003 work began to restore the gatehouse and catacombs funded by a £500,000 grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund

The Gatehouse (Grade II listed) is built directly over Porter Brook in classical architecture with Egyptian features. The gateway resembles a Roman arch. It was possibly built over the river so that entering the cemetery was symbolic of the crossing of the river Styx in Greek mythology.

The Egyptian Gate (Grade II listed) is the entrance to the cemetery on Cemetery Road. It is richly ornamented and possesses a sculpted gate bearing two coiled snakes holding their tails in their mouths.

The Nonconformist chapel (Grade II listed) is built in classical style with Egyptian features. The sculpted panel above the door shows a dove, representing the Holy Ghost or the Holy Spirit. Stone steps lead down to a wall with catacomb-like entrances.

The Anglican chapel (added in 1850; Grade II listed). Designed in the Neo-Gothic style by William Flockton. Unlike the other buildings in the cemetery, the chapel was built in Gothic style rather than Classical or Egyptian. The building is distinctive in style due to its ogival windows, the porte-cochere and the spire. The spire is indeed far too big for the rest of the building, built purposely so that it would be seen from afar.

The Registrar's house (Grade II listed)

The Catacombs. There are two rows of catacombs built into the hillside, this method of burial was unpopular and only ten bodies were laid to rest in the catacombs in the first 10 years.

The Dissenters' Wall was built between 1848 and 1850. It divided the older Nonconformist part of the cemetery from the consecrated Anglican ground. The wall runs almost uninterrupted, from the perimeter wall on Cemetery Road to the path beside the Porter Brook at the bottom of the cemetery.

George Bassett (1818–1886). Founder of The Bassett Companyâ€â€the company that invented Liquorice Allsorts. Lord Mayor of Sheffield (1876).

George Bennett (died 1841). Founder of the Sheffield Sunday School movement. The memorial to him (c.1850) is Grade II listed.[11]

John, Thomas, and Skelton Cole. Founders of Sheffield's Cole Brothers department store in 1847â€â€now part of the John Lewis Partnership.

Francis Dickinson (1830–1898). One of the soldiers who fought in the Charge of the Light Brigade during the Crimean war.

William Dronfield (1824–1891). Founder of the United Kingdom Alliance of Organised Trades, which inspired the creation of the Trades Union Congress.

Mark Firth (25 April 1819–28 November 1880). Steel manufacturer, Master Cutler (1867), Lord Mayor of Sheffield (1874), and founder of Firth College in 1870 (later University of Sheffield). The monument to Mark Firth is Grade II listed,[12] the railings that surround it were made at Firth's Norfolk Works.

William Flockton, architect.

John Fowler. Father of the designer of the Forth Rail Bridge (also called John).

John Gunson (1809–1886). Chief engineer of the Sheffield Water Company at the time of the collapse of Dale Dyke Dam on 11 March 1864, which resulted in the Great Sheffield Flood. Samuel Harrison, who documented the flood, and 77 of the flood's victims are also buried in the cemetery.

Samuel Holberry (1816–1842). A leading figure in the Chartist movement.

Isaac Ironside (1808–1870). Chartist and local politician.

James Montgomery (1771–1854). Poet/Publisher. The grave and Grade II listed monument to James Montgomery, were moved to the grounds of Sheffield Cathedral in 1971.[13]

James Nicholson (died 1909). Prominent Sheffield industrialist. The memorial that he commissioned for himself and his family c.1872 is Grade II listed.[14]

William Parker, merchant. The monument to William Parker, erected in 1837 by the merchants and manufacturers of Sheffield, is Grade II listed.[15]

William Prest (died 1885). Cricketer and footballer born in York, who lived most of his life in Sheffield. Co-founder of Sheffield Football club

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These are the crypts.

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aparantly theres been satanic rituals done inside here and night time atracts many um disturbed people. the chapel has been arsoned before (SO annoying drives me crazy!) still a cool explore for me had fun.

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thanks for the comments ill have a look at your group nelly just aplied thanks :)

And I just added you fella, send me a friends req of FB mate

:thumb

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Cool write up and great pics.

As already said such a shame the level of distruction.

Cheers for the share

:thumb

groping in cemetaries? haha :D

Looks a nice wander, and it involves dead people..win! Lovely pics :)

Star hahaha

:zombie

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  • Similar Content

    • By Urbexbandoned
      History
       
      A bit of a mish mash as I couldn't find much just on the Chapel but this is what I did find. 
       
      After its closure, the land of the former Hospital was purchased for residential development by Bloor Homes. It was sold off to various other developers such as Redrow, Barratt, Harron Homes, Wimpey and PJ Livesey although Bloor’s were the major house builder for the new Wadsley Park estate which was constructed on the site of the old hospital. The Wadsley Park village consists of a mixture of houses and apartments of various sizes. Some of the old hospital structures were designated as listed buildings, the main admin block (the clock tower), Kingswood ward, the church and the porters lodge were all grade II listed and could not be demolished with the rest of the hospital.
      The administration building and clock tower were converted into 38 luxury apartments by Urbani after permission to demolish the building was denied and the building is now known as Middlewood Lodge. The Kingswood ward has been converted into 85 apartments by developers PJ Livesey and is known as Kingswood Hall. The porter's lodge on Middlewood Road has been refurbished and is now a nursery. The hospital church has been derelict for many years, it held its last service on 6 November 1996 to mark the closure of the hospital. In March 2012 plans were submitted by architectural design consultancy Coda Studios that may see the imposing Victorian church converted into a mixture of town houses and apartments. The scheme which needs approval from Sheffield City Council also contains proposals for a selection of partially underground eco-friendly bungalows beneath the building.
       
      The Explore 
       
      Visited with @hamtagger , we had allready been on one explore in Sheffield and were running out of daylight hours so needed one that wasn't going to take long. I had seen the post @Paulpowers had posted on this little chapel and liked the look of it. 
      Not much left to it really but what I did see was nice. The initial thought I had when seeing it was it looked like a really gloomy church. Almost hidden beneath greenery you could see the spire and top poking out as we approached. Entry was relatively easy. The ground had been dug out inside with channels in between each Column. I am assuming they do this to see what the foundations are like. Actually I didn't assume this. HT told me and I just thought it would make me a little more intelligent haha! 
      The structure is pretty sound, quite sad to see how much graf and vandalism this place has had. It's always quite sad to see someone deface the 'house of god'. Not that I am religious or anything but more respectful if anything. 
      There are some wonderful stained glass windows in here, especially the one which was placed in there just after World War II. Anyway, not much left to say on this place. 
       
      1: The Exterior 
       

       
      2: The inside looking back from the Altar 
       

       
      3: 
       

       
      4: 
       

       
      5: The right Transept windows 
       

       
      6: The remains of the Organ 
       

       
      7: The Original flooring, mostly covered in Pigeon Shit 
       

       
      8: One of the few remaining Stained Glass windows 
       

       
      9: The part I liked the most, still 100% intact too. A little slice of history
       

       
       
    • By shacklerurbex
      short vid of a back up splore few months back, nice artwork.
       
       
    • By Wevsky
      Wasn't going to do a report seeing as how Woody covered it so nicely but it has been a while since my last report and i thought why not.Rumour has it that the place is locked up but doesn't sound like its been locked officially either so really not sure of the state of play here!
      This did have a Casualty Clearing Station on its upper level which over the years caused rumours of it being an underground hospital,that and the fact there are so very many bunks in the place.It is a two level jobby with stairs leading further up to an old entrance,these stairs are in short rotten and in no way could you put full weight onto them without much crashing of wood coming down the many flights of stairs to the bottom so it was a case of climb on the framework of the stairs to get about.
      got wind of this when a few private pics went up and between us worked out where what and how..so off we popped,Visited with The Wickerman & obscurity..
      some pics..there all pretty samey but it is a nice old explore


















      Sorry about the amount of pics..well tbh im not sorry at all






      Another report rehosted from photocuntbucket to flcikr
    • By WildBoyz
      History

      “Here in Sheffield we have a proud sporting heritage and it is important that we build upon that to create the right environment in which the sportsmen and women of the future can train, develop and thrive… But it isn’t just about the elite, it is about every man, woman and child in our city being fitter, healthier and enjoying physical activity” (Isobel Bowler, cabinet member for culture, sport and leisure at Sheffield council).

      Chapeltown Baths opened sometime at the beginning of the 1960s. Locally, the facility was very popular, especially among children, and many people have indicated that the place has played a big part in their lives. The baths also held regular swimming galas which always attracted large audiences as parents and guardians would flock to the stands to observe. However, despite the fondness for the centre, it was often regarded as being too small and outdated. One for the clubs that used the pool on a regular basis, for instance, had to establish a waiting list for the people wanting to join. 

      New plans to redevelop the site into a larger, more modern, venue were launched by Sheffield Council sometime between 2010 and 2015. Plans for the new facility revealed that a two-storey extension would be added to the front of the existing building, to house a gymnasium, flexible activity/exhibition space and a community café. The aim was to create a welcoming and revitalised health and fitness centre for the local area. The main entrance was to be moved to the back of the current site where a large glazed atrium would be constructed, and, as for the pool itself, it was to be modernised and larger changing areas for both males and females were to be installed. Nevertheless, in the end the plans were scrapped as it was decided that the site was simply too small to revamp and in the long run would not offer value for money. 

      After the original plans were abandoned, a plan to build a brand-new leisure centre was proposed. The new £7 million project was quickly accepted and construction of the facility began in 2015, up the road from the old site in High Green. The erection of the new leisure centre was said to have been one of the first leisure developments in Sheffield in over a decade. The Thorncliffe Recreation Centre is now open and most of the staff from Chapeltown Baths were said to have been moved over. Various reports suggest that the new pool is larger and has an extra lane, and that a new community has been established there. Although the new site does not have the same character, local residents generally seem happy with the new facility. 

      As for the former Chapeltown Baths site, it has remained abandoned since the beginning of 2016. No plans have been set in stone yet; however, it is rumoured that the building will be demolished to make way for affordable housing. In the meantime, like most abandoned sites, the building has experienced increasing incidents of vandalism in recent months as local goons have managed to get their hands on a few brushes, several tins of Wilko One Coat and a box of safety matches. Smoke at the site was reported in March 2017, coming from the basement, and this resulted in the fire service being called to attend the scene. It is reported that they and had to cut their way into the building to extinguish a small fire. Fortunately, in this instance there was very little damage. As things stand presently, SCAFF Security Alarms Ltd. claim they have sealed the premises and installed various security systems to prevent any further vandalism. 

      Our Version of Events

      With a couple of hours to kill before we hit some of Sheffield’s legendary pubs later that evening, we decided to pop across to Chapeltown and take a look at the old public swimming pool that had recently been brought to our attention. None of us have ever been to Chapeltown before and I can’t say we were expecting to discover anything amazing there, but one thing we did notice is that the townspeople aren’t doing themselves any favours in terms of attracting tourists to the area. For instance, there’s a large sign in the centre of the town that reads, ‘Fast trains to Sheffield and Barnsley’, implying that you should probably get going as soon as possible. However, we chose to ignore the advice and hang around for a little while instead. 

      Finding the old swimming pool wasn’t particularly difficult. We sort of stumbled across it before needing to consult Google Maps for guidance. After that, we lingered around the bus stop that’s positioned right outside for a while, trying to work out why the metal shutter that should have been covering the main entrance looked like someone had had a go at it with a tin opener. At first, we were convinced that some incredibly ambitious explorer had decided to break in that way, rather than simply peel off a board. But, as we discovered later on, it turns out it was the firefighters who’d hacked a hole in the shutter. Even so, there was no evidence that they’d managed to get into the building that way – unless they had the keys to the building – because the front door behind it was still locked up tight. Fortunately, though, the shutter wasn’t the only opening the fire service had created. It is thanks to those guys, then, and their arsenal of cutting tools that we managed to get inside. 

      Once inside the building, we didn’t have to worry about being spotted from the outside since all the windows at ground level had been boarded over. This made capturing images a bit easier because we could wave the torches around a bit. However, the downside to our visit was that we were a bit late getting to this one as the local goons have been inside and clearly they got a little bit overexcited. Hence why there’s a mountain of shit in the pool and broken glass everywhere. On the positive side, however, the fire damage was minimal, limited to a very small section of the basement area. In that sense, the rest of the building remains unscathed. 

      All in all, it took us around forty minutes to cover the building from the basement to the loft. Afterwards, we left feeling satisfied that something new in Sheffield had turned up, but even more delighted that we were heading straight for The Fat Cat for no fewer than eight pints of Kelham Island’s finest and a plate of homemade curry. Many hours later, after an innumerable number of pints, two curries and several packets of peanuts, we staggered back out onto the streets of Sheffield. We were tempted to have a quick look at Minitron while we were so close, but since the lampposts on the other side of the street were swaying in a very unusual manner, we decided to call it a day and head back into town for one final pint before bed. 

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    • By shacklerurbex
      I had a few days off last month so decided to go to Dyson.
       
      As you can see it was quite foggy which made the whole thing feel pretty creepy, solo explore as well. lotta fun.
       
      I will be doing a revisit at some point and hopefully with a drone

      The building, in Sheffield, closed its doors in 2006 and since then the gutted remains have been left to rust.
      The Dyson Group, founded by John Dyson, opened their first factory in Sheffield in 1834 at the tail end of the Industrial Revolution, before later moving to this site.
       
      Using new software to edit videos so should be a big improvement in quality!
       
       


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