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Paulpowers

F&B Underground medical centre, Sheffield - Aug 2013

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I been in here before but didn't take my tripod due to the climb and I really wasn't happy with the pictures, this time I've got a new lightweight tripod and had tame to spare so in I went

Firth Brown Steels was initially formed in 1902, when Sheffield steelmakers John Brown & Company exchanged shares and came to a working agreement with neighbouring company Thomas Firth & Sons. In 1908 the two companies came together and established the Brown Firth Research Laboratories and it was here, in 1912, under the leadership of Harry Brearley they developed high chrome stainless steel. The companies continued under their own management until they formally merged in 1930 becoming Firth Brown Steels. The company is now part of Sheffield Forgemasters.

The road currently has roadworks but a lorry driver had parked up for a sleep which made for some really good cover :D

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