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thecrazyfool

Tapioca Farm, Belgium – July, 2013

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No picture of the Tapioca, has it gone?

Lovely set though chuck! Thanks for sharing

Haha....there was but I wasn't satisfied with the shot and wanted to catch some summer rays!

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What amazes me is that this is a well trodden place and its been nearly a year since I've been there the first time and it still looks great.

Nice photos too btw :)

It's stayed almost totally intact since it was abandoned in 1995 which is an astonishing feat considering how well trodden it is in these circles, it really shows the respect for places like this over the water.

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These little places continue to amaze me in the fact they're left untouched and forgotten, completely different mentality to the 'lets wreck it' attitude of the UK. Of course media coverage doesn't help. It's probably a good thing there's no history on the place, if it was well known it wouldn't look like that!

Excellent set mate.

Damn right, couldn't have put it better!

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It also helps this place is in a tiny village in the middle of nowhere, with residents living opposite who, from personal experience and stories I've heard don't really mind photographers going in, but I bet if they heard any idiots milling around they'd be right on it!

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267A0846-850_zps30a6be68.jpg

Bloody nice shot this. Sad to say it doesn't look like this now, it's definitely starting to get trashed. One of my favourites from my first visit to Belgium in the summer and since my return the other day, well, lets say you can see the difference. Still worth going to though but the magic isn't quite the same. Fuck, I hope this doesn't go the way of Potters.

Edited by Luke

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when i visited i didnt even phtograph the place ,we just slept in there as it was dry and had a cool sofa .

Nice shot tcf if it had been light when i was there we may have taken some shots,but we hot footed it down to pick you up from that lovely hostel you stayed in

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when i visited i didnt even phtograph the place ,we just slept in there as it was dry and had a cool sofa .

Nice shot tcf if it had been light when i was there we may have taken some shots,but we hot footed it down to pick you up from that lovely hostel you stayed in

Me and Mr. Saint used it for the exact same purpose fella, though we dropped in early enough to get some shots in the last of the days light. Not a bad place for a kip even if I kept us up most of night with ghost stories. :D

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Me and Mr. Saint used it for the exact same purpose fella, though we dropped in early enough to get some shots in the last of the days light. Not a bad place for a kip even if I kept us up most of night with ghost stories. :D

the moonlight coming over the trees at night had me thinking people with torches where out the back..so not much sleep was had

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when i visited i didnt even phtograph the place ,we just slept in there as it was dry and had a cool sofa .

Nice shot tcf if it had been light when i was there we may have taken some shots,but we hot footed it down to pick you up from that lovely hostel you stayed in

Cheers I remember! That hostel was crap....should have roughed it.

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Can someone give me the adres please?

Im afraid thats just not going to happen, if you ask on a public forum for an address you are really not helping yourself out mate!

So you joined today and expect locations handed out to you!i would have a read of the FAQ'S mate !

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