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Hi from darkest Wiltshire

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What ho chaps,just a quickie to say hi.I was directed here by his Nellyship and was known as oldscrote in another place.

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Welcome along..if your a freind of nelly does that mean your one of the football loving brigade..if so we wont hold it against you :thumb

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Don't forget to get some reports up mate, I know you have some great archived stuff that the members here will love.


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Cheers for all your greetings chaps,fortunately I'm not a footy fan but I do enjoy my cricket.OK Nelly I'll have a rummage through the archive and see what I've got.

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