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Wevsky

Fan bay shelter To be sealed and reopened to public

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Someone mentioned that this shelter was to be sealed..Sounded like bollox to me but this has appeared

I have seen lots of rumours doing the rounds on the internet over the last few weeks that Fan Bay is going to be permanently sealed up. I actually work for the National Trust and administer the Fan Bay tunnels. I wanted to let you know what our plans are. I know they won’t be initially popular with some people but I hope you will understand the National Trust’s position and that you might actually be interested in helping us out with the project.

The National Trust purchased the remaining section of the White Cliffs in-between Langdon Cliffs and South Foreland last year; we also purchased Fan Bay deep shelter in the process. The National Trust had planned to seal up the tunnels in a much more robust way than the St Margarets shelter which has suffered repeated and costly break-ins over the years. It would have been shuttered and filled in with concrete. I then put forward an alternative proposal to open the tunnels up to the public; I have now secured the funds and am the project lead.

Fan Bay will be secured over the next few weeks using a metal door which is surrounded by deep concrete shuttering. However this is still only a temporary fix pending works to the tunnels which will be reopened to the public in 2015. We plan to open up the two entrances into the side of Fan Hole and we are also planning to excavate the two sound mirrors. The sound mirrors if they remain are rare First World War survivors and some of the first to be constructed in the UK. We will also excavate and expose the remains of the WWII surface structure. The tunnels will remain unlit, and will remain in their raw historical state, the public donning hard hats and torches to go down via a guided tour. Minimal works will be completed inside the tunnels to make some sections safe. The corners of the stairs and the southern entrance tunnel will be re-finished in wood by mine engineers and will match the original work left by the 1940s tunnelling company. The sections of support which were actually left by the scrap men who started to strip the tunnels in the 1950s, will remain where they were left. The ventilation which has fallen down will also be reconnected using the original techniques.

We will be working on the inside of the tunnels over the next year. There will be the chance for people to volunteer and get involved, please let me know if you wish to do so. I need help with the digging; I need help with historical research and I would love to utilise people’s skills in photography. I am also more than happy to arrange trips down Fan Bay for interested parties, from November. My office is at South Foreland lighthouse where I am the site manager and I am more than happy to meet and discuss our plans in more detail.

I am actually a caver and am passionate about all things underground. I have been around for quite a while and have been underground with many of you. I am usually an advocate of open access sites and this is why the tunnels have remained accessible during the last year of our ownership to enable people to see them prior to our works. So whatever the whys and wherefores are of sealing up or managing underground spaces, I hope people realise that this is the best case scenario for Fan Bay. The project will preserve the public access, as well as the character of the tunnels which have suffered considerable damage over the last few years. It will also help us to tell the important and often forgotten story of the Cross Channel guns.

If you havnt seen it then you may be to late!

later to this i found this pic on facebook

1235119_10151936434024203_1585863285_n.jpg

the bloke seems genuine enough and is hoping for a good reaction to this and people are welcome to offer any help with prepairing this

his contact details are...

If you have any queries email southforeland@nationaltrust.org.uk FAO Jon Barker.

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Cheers Wevs, we were going to have a look here the weekend :( Despite never getting to explore it I'm glad something is being done to preserve these important historic structures!

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I heard a rumor its been re opened a bit sooner than Jon Expected

:o

yes so it seems..with a more robust replacement :)

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Was up there last weekend having a wander about, it certainly is re-sealed and looks like a more permanent job this time. For those that know how entry to this could be a bit slippery when wet there is a nice looking ladder under that metal doorway leading down into the gloom! Langdon hole was OK..still open :-)

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from speaking to the guy and comments he lft on fb it seems as langdon is off the beaten path they have no reason to seal it up!Think they have spent a fair bit of time so far clearing the mud from the steps for future visits..with help from the men in beards of course(kurg)

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Was up there last weekend having a wander about, it certainly is re-sealed and looks like a more permanent job this time. For those that know how entry to this could be a bit slippery when wet there is a nice looking ladder under that metal doorway leading down into the gloom! Langdon hole was OK..still open :-)

I ended up sliding down it on my ass even though it was bone dry, still dont know how I managed that!

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Awesome stuffs, I'm a volunteer for a few other underground projects, its awesome to be involved in unearthing history, literally! I have lame transport issues but im certainly interested in being of use, Im in between jobs atm as well so have; time, internet, research skills, funding experience and i speak legislation and policies when i have too and im happiest ickle soldier getting my hands dirty!" if possible,ive been keen to get dahn saff for a while :)

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