Jump to content
The Invisableman

Other Belgium / France (briefly) Tour June 2013

Recommended Posts

As you may have noticed i'm not big on doing reports anymore. Probably though no other fact that i can't be arsed half the time and that it takes me so long to edit the shots that by the time im done several thousand people have already seen it, bought the t-shirt etc, etc.

Anyhow's, here we are again. June 2012 saw the tourists hit Belgium and France (briefly)and did it the only way a tourist would, by seeing everything that everyone else has already seen :) As much as we failed, we succeeded. Dodgy sat nav's bad co-ordinates and a close encounter with France's finest couldn't stop us rolling across this fine country on our quest to boldly go where everyone one else has been.

These places don't need any introduction and i don't intend to start now, so sit back, put your feet up and i hope you enjoy the pics.

9682925341_85c2a4da2d.jpg

9690620288_bfb631b95f.jpg

9646304688_8157cbf7b5.jpg

9354689284_f935182750.jpg

9333293783_e50157ed32.jpg

9231407459_967392fb63.jpg

9258350690_866140cef4.jpg

9515731289_b9981418ce.jpg

9177263962_67fc4c6f84.jpg

9187259014_11e6b5fa86.jpg

9168523986_49b28e63b4.jpg

9304081044_cd9872a743.jpg

9326522359_ae2b381a7f.jpg

9378616471_7d8159dac5.jpg

9362211860_8a94f94dd6.jpg

10210706774_3e65eeafbf.jpg

10210601694_b81dc25e99.jpg

9162964565_bca4042897.jpg

9595549120_d3b3fe1bac.jpg

10210724463_dea33943b3.jpg

Cheers for looking :)

Edited by The Invisableman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mesmerising - every one a winner.

Not been there, not got the t-shirt - in fact apart from the prison (which I'm guessing is the same as I've seen before) it's all brand new so hey, you've made me happy. :cool:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thank you all very kindly. Which one don't you recognise webs?

The few from this place mate...i know the others as all bar varia ive visted them ;)

9258350690_866140cef4.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Similar Content

    • By Ninurta
      Baikonur cosmodrome. Kazakhstan.
       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

    • By Doug
      Details in video.
      DeScent drowned tragically (is there any other way) in a Brisbane drain as a result of a flash flood.
       
      [youtube=
       
    • By franconiangirl
      At first glance, the huge psychiatry campus with its historical buildings reminds you of certain pieces of literature or films. The early morning haze lies over the hospital grounds and really adds to that somewhat uncanny atmosphere. It´s still pretty early in the morning. Thus, we almost don´t meet any people. A situation, that changed completely on our way back, when we had to keep as insconspicious as possible among patients, nursing stuff and "normal" visitors. Yet, everything´s still pretty calm and we can enjoy the morning silence as we walk across the park-like grounds of the hospital, walking on paths which are bordered by beautiful flowers. Here and there, beautiful buildings appear. Everything occurs to be peaceful and neat. Almost a place for your well-being, at least form the perspective of a non-patient. Not before we pass by a building, fenced up by thick bars, reality sets in. As if by command, we can suddenly hear screams coming out of the building. 

      The hospital is largely still active. Only a small part has been disused out of unknown reasons. It seems like time´s been standing still here for a pretty long time. Old benches would´ve been disappeared in a jungle-like thicket entirely, if it wasn´t for their bright red colours. Across an architectural more than beautiful patio we enter the building in front of us. Inside, particularly striking are the numerous toys scattred around the building. What exact purpose the old building served remains a mystery. 
       

       

       

       

       

       

    • By WildBoyz
      History

      Ouvrage Latiremont is a gros ouvrage (large work) of the Maginot Line – a line of concrete fortifications, obstacles and weapon installations built by France in the 1930s to deter invasion by Germany. The site of Ouvrage Latiremont was selected and approved by the Commission d’Organisation des Régions Fortifiées (CORF) in 1931. It cost eighty-eight million francs (approximately twelve million in pound sterling) to construct the fortification. The design of Ouvrage Latiremont is known as a casemate fortress – a fortified or armoured structure, also referred to as a vaulted chamber, from which guns are fired. Once completed, 75mm and 81mm guns were installed and a second phase was planned, to add additional 75mm and 135mm gun turret blocks. However, the second phase of the development never went ahead as the funding was allocated elsewhere. 

      Latiremont has two main entrances and six combat blocks (three infantry blocks and three artillery). It also comprises more than five kilometres of underground tunnels and galleries; these are at an average depth of thirty metres. A small narrow-gauge railway system, which was connected to a regional military railway system, once linked all six sections of the fortress and it was used to transport supplies, such as equipment, food and ammunition. There were said to be several stations inside Latiremont which were large enough to service and store large trains. Once fully operational, Latiremont was placed under the command of Commandant Pophillat. Pophillat had twenty-one officers and five-hundred and eighty men of the 149th Fortress Infantry Regiment at his disposal. 

      Following the 1939 invasion of Poland, Britain and France declared war on Germany. Thereafter, between the September 1939 and June 1940, Latiremont fired over 14,4  52 75mm rounds and 4,234 81mm rounds at German forces. The fortress, though, was not directly attacked until June 1940. On the 21st June 1940, the German 161st Division led by Colonel Gerhard Wilck, which brought 210mm howitzers and 305mm siege mortars with them, launched their attack against Latiremont. While the attack was underway, a small number of German units moved to the rear of the Maginot Line where they were able to cut power and communications. Despite heavy resistant from Latiremont and nearby fortress Fermont, firing ceased on 25th June and both garrisons surrendered to the German forces on 27th June. For the remainder of the war, the area was used for a German propaganda film, to document the June 1940 attacks, but it did not see any further significant fighting. 

      In 1951 the French government attempted to restore many of the northeastern ouvrages, to defend against a potential advance by the Warsaw Pact. However, following the establishment of the French Nuclear Strike Force, the importance of the Maginot Line diminished. Latiremont was subsequently abandoned by the military in 1967. Today, the fortress remains abandoned and has suffered heavily from water ingress. 

      Our Version of Events

      Aside from drinking beer, this explore was our reason for being on the other side of the English Channel. We weren’t certain at all if the place would be doable, but after reading about it we decided it was probably worth the risk. Nonetheless, towards the end of our trip there was a sudden drop in team morale. This resulted in us taking a vote in an Aldi car park, over French bread and Biscoff, on whether or not we should crack on and drive for three more hours to reach Latiremont, or turn tail and check out a few old manors as we headed back to the ferry terminus. With the votes all in and tucked nicely into a hat, we made a short ceremony out of revealing the results. In the end, the remainers won, four to two, so there would be no leaving Europe just yet. 

      We finished off our Biscoff and spent our remaining Euros on food in Aldi before we set off for Latiremont. Our combined wealth got us a couple of tins of beans, a box of mushrooms and some spices to sprinkle on top. Someone did offer to buy our car in the car park after we got the supplies in, but we had to insist we really needed it to get home to England. The potential buyer still didn’t seem to see that as a problem though. It was quite a mission to shake him. 

      The drive over to the border of Luxembourg was very pleasant. We played some banging tunes and arrived at the location with plenty of time to spare. At first, we had anticipated that finding the fortress in the forest would be quite a challenge, but as it turned out we stumbled across it within ten minutes of being there. Gaining access to the gros ouvrage was a little more tricky of course – it is a military fortress after all! 

      Once inside, we found ourselves in a standard-looking bunker. There were signs and evidence that guns had been positioned in here, and at first we thought that was that. Most bunkers we’ve entered have been fairly compact and bare, and you can usually get through all the rooms very quickly. Our minds were blown, then, when we discovered a lift shaft and, after peering down to see how high it was, realised we couldn’t see the bottom. Obviously extremely excited at the point, at the prospect the place was going to be absolutely huge, we began to make our way down a staircase next to the lift shaft. 

      We made our way down the steps, which went on for a long, long time, until we reached the bottom where we found ourselves in a cold tunnel surrounded by enormous blast doors. It was at this point we realised we’d underestimated how big this place really is. For the next few hours, then, we made our way through different snaking tunnels, and explored many side rooms and chambers leading off from them. One of the best parts of the explore that we came across was some sort of old gun turret. There were plenty of others things to see as well though. This place was certainly a bit of a time capsule. The only problem, however, was that we started to lose track of where we were inside the fortress. It’s very easy to get lost in the labyrinth-like corridors and rooms and we’d eaten all the bread earlier in the day, so making a breadcrumb trail had been out of the question. Eventually, we felt as though we were well and truly lost so decided it was time to find a way back to the surface. It took a little while, and a few false turns, before we found a tunnel that sort of looked familiar. We followed it and, thankfully, ended up back where we started. 

      All in all, then, this explore was absolutely fantastic – certainly one of the best military fortifications we’ve ever explored. It’s also steeped in interesting history about the war. Anyone who happens to find themselves near Luxembourg should definitely pay this place a visit. You never know your luck after all, you might find a way inside like we did. 

      Explored with Ford Mayhem, MKD, Rizla Rider, The Hurricane and Husky. 
       
      1:
       

       
      2:
       

       
      3:
       

       
      4:
       

       
      5:
       

       
      6:
       

       
      7:
       

       
      8:
       

       
      9:
       

       
      10:
       

       
      11:
       

       
      12:
       

       
      13:
       

       
      14:
       

       
      15:
       

       
      16:
       

       
      17:
       

       
      18:
       

       
      19:
       

       
      20:
       

       
      21:
       

       
      22:
       

       
      23:
       

       
      24:
       

       
      25:
       

       
      26:
       

       
      27:
       

       
      28:
       

       
      29:
       

       
      30:
       

       
      31:
       

       
      32:
       

       
      33:
       

       
      34:
       

       
      35:
       

       
      36:
       

       
      37:
       

       
      38:
       

       
      39:
       

       
      40:
       

       
      41:
       

       
      42:
       

       
      43:
       

       
      44:
       

       
      45:
       

       
      46:
       

    • By WildBoyz
      History

      Château D’ah was constructed at some point in the mid-nineteenth century. For many years, it was owned by an aristocratic family, before it became, for a short time at least, a small apostolic school (part of the Apostolic Church). The school closed shortly after the outbreak of World War Two, leaving the house abandoned for a period of time. Somehow, it survived the heavy bombardment of the German invasion, while the town around it crumbled. It is not known who purchased or occupied the château after the war ended. 

      By the later 1950s, the château was purchased by Rémy Magermans, a famous printer and photographer. Magermans founded his company in the late 1940s and moved into the property as his business expanded. As the château comprised a large amount of land, he was able to construct a printing workshop next door to the manor. Magermans owned the building until he passed away in 2009. Since becoming vacant, many people, including photographers, artists and vandals, have visited the site and it has gradually deteriorated.

      Our Version of Events

      After a good session in Brussels, sampling the fine beer of Belgium, we set off in the direction of Luxembourg. Our grand aim was to find an incredibly large underground fortress, but since that entailed a fair bit of driving we figured we might as well check out a few abandoned châteaus along the way. Château D’ah took our fancy because we’d seen some shots of the main downstairs corridor and a very striking staircase. In hindsight, though, if we’d known how fucked the place was going to be, we probably would have given this place a miss and checked out a couple of other locations we had on our list. 

      In terms of gaining access to the site, it was incredibly easy. Vandals have seen to it that anyone can waltz inside these days. Once inside then, we were initially very disappointed. All of the decorative wall paper was ruined, the staircase has been trashed and is rapidly becoming heavily decayed, and everything else around us has been smashed to pieces. Upstairs, things were even worse. Our advice to anyone planning a visit here would be to skip these floors. Other than the reasonably good view from the roof, it’s a complete waste of time going up there. However, there was one really good part to this explore, and it was the reason we decided to post the report. 

      To be perfectly honest, we stumbled across the basement by accident. It turns out that a group of sleep-deprived explorers with severe hangovers aren’t the most observant, so it’s a wonder one of us actually discovered it. Anyway, after noticing it we staggered our way down the stone steps to the bottom. Having only expected to find one room down there, we were pleasantly surprised that there were several rooms and a strange brick corridor. In the end, we spent longer down there than the château itself. We found it was quite photogenic.

      Explored with Ford Mayhem, MKD, Rizla Rider, The Hurricane and Husky. 
       
      1:
       

       
      2:
       

       
      3:
       

       
      4:
       

       
      5:
       

       
      6:
       

       
      7:
       

       
      8:
       

       
      9:
       

       
      10:
       

       
      11:
       

       
      12:
       

       
      13:
       

       
      14:
       

       
      15:
       

       
      16:
       

       
      17:
       

       
      18:
       

       
      19:
       

       
      20:
       

       
      21:
       

       
      22:
       

       
      23:
       

       
      24:
       

       
      25:
       

       
      26:
       

Disclaimer

Oblivion State exists as an online forum to allow like minded individuals to share their experiences of Urban Exploration. We do not condone breaking and entering or other criminal activity and advise all members to read the FAQ articles about the forum and urban exploring in general. All posts are the responsibility of the original poster and all images remain copyright to the original photographer.

We would just like to thank

Forum user AndyK! from Behind Closed Doors for our rather excellent new logo.

All of our fantastic team of Moderators who volunteer their time to keep this place running smoothly.

All of our members for continuing to support Oblivion State by posting up the most awesome content. Thank you everyone!
×