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Landie_Man

UK Oriental City Shopping Centre, Collindale, North London - October 2013

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So this had been on my radar for a while, I even visited here in January 2005 with my parents and some friends to buy some Chinese ingredients for a special meal that was being cooked for an occasion of which I can't remember.

At 14 years old this place was really interesting, lots of interesting food and foreign ingredients. I remember getting a plate and having a little bit of everything from about 4 stalls, the food stalls were round in a square shape and the communal seating in the middle. They had all sorts, Chinese, Japanese, Malaysian, Singaporean, Korean etc.

I remember seeing it reported on way back in 2011, but put it off due to rumours of heavy handed security.

Me and Northern_Ninja visited early this year and couldn't even get into the site. We returned for another go and saw a small gap.

It was a good day out and sort of cheered me up slightly following a personal grievance.

The complex served a large Community in North London and people would travel a long way to browse its two stories of restaurants, bars, clubs, shops and supermarkets.

It was originally a Yaohan Shopping Centre; but changed its name when the Yahoan Corp went bust in the 90s.

There was a durian stall, a satay stall, a Karaoke bar called the "China City Karaoke Bar", Dim Sum restaurants and a Szechuan restaurant to name a few. The centre also included tableware and clothes shops.

It had featured on the TV series "Luther" and on the movie Dredd, where the interior was modified to look more trashed sadly. It has also fallen victim to vandals.

Onto the pics. Unfortunately I forgot the externals!

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Thanks as always

More at:

Oriental/China City - a set on Flickr

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Very nice indeed! Enjoyed the shots and the write up, nothing like a bit of sploring to take your mind off all the crappyness, thanks for the share :)

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Great to see this done and cool shots bud.

Holds some of the funniest memories that are akin to a combo of the keystone cops and Benny Hill

Fair play guys on getting the place done and thanks for the share

:thumb

:comp:

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Where are the zombies?

Wevs eat them all I heard it all :o

Nice report mate shame to see what damage a few episodes of a tv series can do to the inside :)

Agreed mate Looks a tad trashed from a while back but still well worth a run around :thumb

Will never forget you going spaz on secca lol Top draw :lol:

The Met were Happy :D

lll.jpg

Edited by skeleton key

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Top report fella, great set of pics and well done for doing it without alerting secca to the fact you were there, I was there on that comic day with SK and the guys, good memories

:thumb !

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I was thinking about checking this out this year, this was also used as a film location in The Fades which was on BBC3 a couple of years ago. They trashed it up quite a bit then as well.

They used quite a few derp locations though, St Joseph's Missionary College in Mill Hill in one that springs to mind.

Nice pics!

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I was thinking about checking this out this year, this was also used as a film location in The Fades which was on BBC3 a couple of years ago. They trashed it up quite a bit then as well.

They used quite a few derp locations though, St Joseph's Missionary College in Mill Hill in one that springs to mind.

Nice pics!

I remember my wife watching The fades and shouting over to me that wasnt that the shopping centre i had been in and chased my manic secca with bats..happy days ;)

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