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urbex13

Good Morning from Sheffield.

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Hi everyone, I've been posting stuff on the facebook group sporadically for a while now and thought I should probably cave and sign up. I'm not going to bother you with all my old reports and I'm not sure if anyone on here will recognise my username but I've been knocking around in the usual places online for about 5 or 6 years now and just wanted to start putting some stuff up elsewhere.

https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.313951485327254.96974.313936838662052&type=3

Not sure on the protocol regarding links (Mods please edit this if it's not allowed!) but there's a bit of my stuff just to give people a cross section of what I'm into. Frequently moving between Sheffield and Kent (and Belgium/France when I have the cash) so feel free to get in touch, always happy to get involved.

Thirteen.

(Christian).

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Some great shots there mate. Welcome to OS. And please feel free to post up some old stuff if you have something we'll be interested in

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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I've had a HDD fail and I was silly enough not to have backed anything up, I will chuck together a couple of reports from what I have in a little while though. Hopefully I'll get something done this afternoon in time to post it up this evening :)

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I will just add that I went to Sheffield once and I had my car broken into in the shopping centre car park but I won't hold it against you

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I'm from Thanet originally Nelly, not that that helps in terms of reputation.

Thats worse!! Theres some right dodgy Thanetarians on here!!!!

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