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northerngeek

Other Abandoned railway tunnel (2013)

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Abandoned railway tunnel in Oslo, Norway. One of my first splores. Location was shared with me by splorer I met in an abandoned building nearby, and when I was in the tunnel I met two others, one of them who's been my fellow splorer since :-).

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10883438846_c1b21806f0.jpg

Edited by skeleton key

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Thats nice & love that second shot.

Thanks for sharing and a few more pics would be cool my friend.

:thumb

Thanks :-). Ok. All the photos from the tunnel looks basically like theese. But here's a couple from outside the tunnel, or . 10884406766_55121abee0.jpg

rather, an open stretch between two tunnels.

10884406616_b231615111.jpg

Edited by skeleton key

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