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Wherever I may Roam

After The Pictures...... (Liverpool Cinemas)

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Good stuff Roam, get some of your old reports up mate, copy and paste time!!!

(Just please put "Visited Aug 2012" etc in the title)

You've done so much great stuff that it needs sharing here

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    • By jones-y-gog
      I've got a bit of a thing for theatres and cinemas and this one had been tightly sealed for many years and had the reputation of being a real tough nut to crack. When I heard there was a whiff of a chance I realised that I had to act quick if I was to get inside this rather special place. I'm certainly glad I made the effort!
       
      Here's a bit of history n' stuff - 
       
      The ABC Cinema is Grade II listed. It rounds the corner of Lime Street and is one of the first historic buildings, still standing, that visitors see when leaving Lime Street Station.
      ABC acquired the building in 1930, known as The Forum, it opened a year later to become one of the finest cinemas of the era.
      The six storey exterior was designed by A. E. Shannon and its sleek portland stone has very little decoration other than motifs over the entrance. Despite this, the building remains a very distinct feature on Lime Street. The building is listed for its grand interior, which was later subdivided, which is said to remain one of designer William R. Glen's best cinemas.
      There's a news report from December 2016 reporting that the City Council had sold the building to Neptune Investments who say “The next major phase of Lime Street regeneration is now coming forward with the refurbishment and re-opening of the former ABC cinema building on the corner of Lime Street as a major new music and live entertainment venue for the city.”
      A planning application is due to be submitted shortly, with an aim of giving the city a venue of "international standing", that will see the former cinema converted to hold crowds of up to 1,500 for live performances in its famous auditorium, with complementary ancillary uses.
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

    • By WildBoyz
      History

      Victoria Tower, which is also known locally as ‘the Docker’s Clock’, is a Grade II listed Gothic Revival clock tower located alongside Sailsbury Dock in Liverpool. It was designed by Jesse Hartley, an eminent engineer who was responsible for the construction of a large number of the docks and warehouses along the River Mersey. Hartley’s design was inspired by the castle architecture of the Rhine region in Central Europe; this is why the structure was built using irregular blocks of grey granite and why it has embrasures that have been cut into the tower’s walls. 

      The tower was built between 1847 and 1848, to commemorate the opening of Sailsbury Dock. It was also constructed to aid ships using the port. It allowed them to set the correct time as they sailed out into the Irish sea (the time ball was apparently controlled by a signal from the Liverpool Observatory) and was equipped with a bell to warn vessels of impending meteorological changes such as high tide and fog. A navigation light encased inside an ornamental structure was originally planned for the roof of the tower; however, a 9 metre flagpole was installed instead when it was agreed that the structure would not function as a lighthouse. An additional lesser known feature of the tower is that the bottom three levels of the structure served as a flat for the Pier Master. These floors were boarded and designed to be much more comfortable than the rest of the building. 

      On account of the decline in shipping along the Mersey, the condition of Victoria Tower has deteriorated significantly, primarily due to water and wind damage. In addition to these problems, the tower has become overgrown with vegetation over the years, and is now also infested with a large number of pigeons. Although it was announced in 2010 that the clock tower, along with several other historic buildings around the area, would be repaired and fully restored as part of a £5.5 billion restoration programme, no work has yet been initiated. 

      Our Version of Events

      It was getting late on in the evening and we were all keen to get back to our digs for the night to drink beer and play poker, but we also wanted to have a quick wander over to Victoria Tower. We’ve stared at it enough times from the other side of the water, so it seemed about time we paid it a visit. Plenty of fucking around certainly ensued trying to figure out which part of the dock we had to trespass on to get to it; as we were to discover, it’s situated on a piece of land that’s tricky to get to if you’re not very familiar with the area. But, in the end we figured out where we needed to be; right on the other side of a drive-thru movie night. 

      We entered through the main gates of one of the dockyards and wandered towards a small congregation of cars. The plan had been to blend in, but having left the car behind this was very difficult. Fortunately, however, the film was a decent one: Die Hard 1. And we’d entered at the good bit – the scene on the rooftop where Alan is making a last-bid attempt to get rid of Bruce. At this stage in the film Bruce’s vest top was well and truly green. Using the film to our advantage we crept through the cars. We passed a blue Ford Fiesta first, where, much to our delight, the couple inside seemed distracted enough without the film. It looked as though the woman in the passenger seat had dropped her revels somewhere on the driver’s side and was frantically looking for them. She had her head positioned over the driver in a very unusual position. The driver seemed to be helping to force her head down a bit lower too. There must have been an orange flavoured one in his lap or something. A red Volkswagen Golf had to be passed next. The passengers in this one didn’t seem to be focused on the film either though. A rather large flabby woman in her late 50s was pressed up against the windscreen, with both enormous breasts, a cheek and two plump lips firmly plastered against the glass. To our horror she was bouncing up and down a bit, so her folds sounded a bit like window wipers in turbo mode during a heavy downpour. 

      Slightly scarred, psychologically, we made it to the other side of the dockyard. From here to the tower the journey was much less eventful. We had to make haste, however, since the tall palisade gates at the entrance would be closing soon – as soon as the movie was finished. Nothing like a bit of time pressure to spur you on. Unfortunately, though, when we did finally reach the door to the tower we quickly discovered that it was locked up tight. A bit frustrated that we’d already used up some of our gambling and drinking time, we decided to get the ball sacks out and climb our way inside instead. A tiny barred gate wasn’t stopping us from getting into the tower!

      It was around the halfway mark that we decided the climbing part of the plan was a bad idea. It was a chilly night and much more difficult that we’d first imagined. Hartley didn’t think it through when he designed overhanging ledges on the tower, which are now caked in a fine layer of slippery moss and pigeons’ cloacal secretions. Nevertheless, we’d watched the classic Stallone movie Cliffhanger three nights previously, so we knew we should probably just man the fuck up and get the climb done. Each of us had more than a t-shirt on too, so I don’t know what we were complaining about. We reached the top just as Alan was hanging off the side of Nakatomi Plaza. Everyone gathered at the top of the tower and peered through the crenels as Alan was plummeting to the ground; we were glad we’d made it in time to see the best scene in the film. You know what they say after all, it’s not really Christmas until Hans Gruber falls from a building. 

      A few minutes were spent taking shots from the roof, but it was very a windy evening so the tripods ended up taking quite a battering. In the end we had to make do with the few usable nightscape shots we’d managed to take. Some luck was on our side, though, since some thoughtful chavs, who I presume were wearing Burberry check, had smashed the lock off the hatch. This made getting inside the tower much easier. An explosion of pigeony disease-ridden gas erupted as we lifted the lid. It smelt like thousands of them were down there, slowly drowning in their own shit and piss. For some reason we decided to crack on anyway, as you do. So, we climbed down the several broken rungs we could see into the depths of the festering pit of doom. A very sketchy bendy ladder came next. It was clearly some sort of improvisation to make up for the lack of staircase. At the bottom the situation didn’t improve either, as we found ourselves literally knee deep in shit and rotting carcasses. Pigeon pie was definitely off the menu later that evening. We hastily plodded on, racing down the rusted spiral staircases, trying our best not to disturb the crusted layers of poo. After all, you can’t leave an explore until you’ve seen absolutely everything there is to see. 

      We didn’t hang about inside the tower for long after reaching the bottom, especially since we’d recently discovered that you can catch Chlamydia psittaci from contaminated bird droppings. That’s right, you can catch ‘the clam’ while urbexing! Although, having said that, this type is definitely a lot worse than the kind you’ll get from having ‘protected’ sex with a resealable sandwich bag. Anyway, back to the story. We managed to get back out onto the street just as the credits of the film were rolling down the screen. Thank fuck too, because climbing the fence would have been shit! After that we headed back to the car and, for most of us, this signified the end of the night where the rest of the evening would be spent drinking beer and playing several games of poker and pigeon toss (it sounds like a dirty game, but we assure you it’s quite innocent). 

      Explored with Ford Mayhem, Rizla Rider, Husky and Soul. 
       
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    • By jamespaul
      hello all.
      just thought I would introduce myself...im 6ft 2 31 years or age male from Liverpool. im a newbee and very adventurous and daring with a great personality.
      I know Liverpool offers a new world of hidden gems to explore. willing to try anything; even if its risky.
      i am looking to meet a few fellow explorers.
      msg back plz
      $ j
    • By macc_explore
      The Explore
      Another early morning of explores in Liverpool city centre and again tried the Futurist with no luck (one day we will get in there somehow)  ended up in the old X in the City strip club.. lets just say this brought back some fond memories
       
      Explored with @The Man In Black 
       
      The History
      X in the City has now moved from to Wood Street in the city centre, the local council tried its best to stop the move but £80,000 deal was struck and the club moved locations leaving this one abandoned.
       
      X in the City is Liverpool’s number one lap dancing bar for stag nights. Hundreds of groups of lads come to X in the City throughout the year for their stag nights and most return when the next stag night comes round. The reason for this is that the atmosphere is perfect for stag nights.
       
      Unlike other lap dancing bars, at X in the City you can stand at the bar and enjoy a pint, or watch one of the many stage shows, or sit at a table with the company of a gorgeous girl. 
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

    • By macc_explore
      The Explore
      When I seen a report of this place pop up I had to get back over to Liverpool and check it out.. going to school just down the road the thought of getting inside Holly Lodge as a teenager was like a dream haha... fast forward 20 odd years and I finally get inside although for an entirely different reason
       
      Like a buy one get two free explore this with the hospital and police station sets adding to the interest of the place.. all in all a nice little explore with @The Man In Black 
       
      The History
      Holly Lodge started out life in 1828 as a detached Georgian house in West Derby, Liverpool.

      The house became part of Holly Lodge Girls' College, and was in use until 2015 when a new college was built within the grounds. The building is due to be demolished to make way for nearly 60 new houses being built by Redrow. The site includes two Grade II listed buildings, Fremont and Sandheys - which will be saved as part of the proposals.

      Since its closure, the buildings have been used for filming, including sets for a police station, a prison and a hospital. The sets comprise mainly corridors and only a few other rooms.
       

       

       
      The School

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      The Hospital
       

       

       
      The Police Station
       

       

       

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