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Drakelow Tunnels Houses 'Drug Factory'

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Hi guys, as some of you might now I am a volunteer worker at Drakelow so I thought I would give you the information first along our volunteers press release.

On a personal note I am absolutely gutted, there are so many good people who have given up a lot of their own time, money and resources to help restore this historical site. Just as the possibility of getting the museum open was coming into grasp it feels like it might all be taken away by this news.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-hereford-worcester-25124814http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-hereford-worcester-25124814

A large-scale cannabis farm has been found in an underground former nuclear bunker, West Mercia Police have said.

More than 400 cannabis plants with an estimated street value of £650,000 were seized from Drakelow Tunnels, near Kidderminster in Worcestershire.

A 45-year-old man has been arrested in a separate dawn raid in Kidderminster.

During the Cold War, the tunnels were designated as the potential site of a regional seat of government in the event of a nuclear attack.

Underground kitchen

The regional seat of government kitchen was used at the start of the Cold War

"[Officers] found a network of hydroponic equipment including heating, lighting and ventilation fans," said Supt Kevin Purcell.

The 285,000 sq ft network of tunnels stretches for about three miles and was used in World War Two to house a machine-part factory.

The tunnels were also used by the Ministry of Supply throughout the 1950s for storage, and much of the original equipment is still in place.

More recently plans were revealed by the site's owners to transform the tunnels into a museum. -BBC News

Drakelow Tunnels Volunteers Press Release:

The volunteers of Drakelow Tunnels are amazed at the information that has come to light. The volunteers have operated with preservation in mind and have had fundraising events such as open days to educate past and future generations on the WWII and Cold War history of the complex.

We have run work parties with volunteers to renovate the tunnels since March 2010 and were hopeful of getting planning application to turn the complex into a museum. We are now afraid all this hard work may come to nothing.

Until we find out more information we are unable to comment further.

Thanks for reading

Edited by bango

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It was defo a bit shocking to hear the news yesterday and am sure once the investigation is completed all will ok for you guys.

Of course it raises allot of questions but im sure if reaches court and the CPS go for a prosecution all will be answered and you guys can get on with the great work you have been doing.

:thumb

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