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France The other side of Prison 15H - Woman and Men - November 2013

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    • By cgeff
      Hi All,
       
      Some pictures of a mine. A spot quite dangerous but a great place !
       
      Hope you will like these pictures
       

       

       

       

    • By cgeff
      Hi all,
       
      Some pictures from "Bureau Central"
      Hope that you will like these ones
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

    • By Harry
      A sunny winters day on the Jurassic Coast - drinking coffee, murdering bacon sandwiches and hunting for concrete - top day!
      One of our targets was Studland bay, where once upon a time the likes of King George VI, Churchill, Eisenhower along with General Bernard Montgomery and Acting Admiral Louis Mountbatten congregated to witness the largest live ammunition practice of the entire war - a full-scale rehearsal for the invasion of Europe and thousands took part - they watched from Fort Henry a demonstration of carpet bombing, followed by an assault landing by troops, a truly momentous occasion. Alas, history over, here are some pictures:
      Fort Henry - a lookout for the likes of King George VI, Churchill, Eisenhower, General Bernard Montgomery and Acting Admiral Louis Mountbatten.

      Inside

      Dragons teeth - anti-tank defences

      The area of Studland bay was also heavily fortified - here is one of the gun emplacements.

      The bolts that mounted the gun, set within the concrete.

      Inside it's magazine.

      ... and finally, a pillbox (i won't bore you with the others) - i do wonder if this one will last another 70 years though!

    • By Andy
      Ouvrage Hobling is a lesser work (petit ouvrage) of the Maginot Line. Hobling was approved for construction by CORF (Commission d'Organisation des Régions Fortifiées), the Maginot Line's design and construction agency, in 1931 and became operational by 1935, at a cost of 14 million francs. The contractor was Gianotti of Nice. Hobling consists of four combat blocks. The blocks are linked by an underground gallery with barracks and a utility area (usine). The galleries are excavated at an average depth of up to 30 metres (98 ft).
      In June 1940 the garrison comprised 115 men and 4 officers of the 164th Fortress Infantry Regiment (RIF). The commanding officer was Captain Boileau. The Casernement de Férange provided peacetime above-ground barracks and support services to Hobling and other positions in the area. The units were under the umbrella of the 3rd Army, Army Group 2.
      Hobling played no significant role in either the Battle of France in 1940 or the Lorraine Campaign of 1944. After the Second World War it became part of the Mòle de Boulay, a strongpoint in the northeastern defenses against Soviet attack. Hobling remained under Army control until after 1971, when it was declassified and sold. Sold in 1975, Hobling has been partially stripped by salvagers and is abandoned. The salvage work stopped with the removal of all metals, including cloches and turrets, from two blocks. Hobling was the last ouvrage to be stripped.
       
      Visited with @The_Raw
       
       
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    • By Lavino
      Visited with @albino jay and @GK-WAX and thanks again to jay for doing the driving and I also stole your history mate because I couldn’t find any hope you don’t mind. We was passing by the mill on our way home so popped in for a look. And glad we did I like these old mills. And the demo team were already on site so don’t know how long it has left to stand. So here’s the history and pics..
       
      Steam-powered worsted-spinning mill built around 1850 on Black Brook.
       
      Owners and tenants of the mills have included
      James Nutton & Company [1863]
      John Horsfall & Sons Limited [1896]
      F. K. Adcock & Company [1936]
      Part of the Mills are still standing though no longer used.
      The mill had a 170 ft tall chimney which was struck by lightning in 1967. The chimney was reduced in height – to avoid further strikes – and was finally demolished in March/April 1992
       
      The majority of the Mills were demolished in 2017.
       
      The mill by Lavino lavino[/
       
      The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
       
      The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
       
      The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
       
      The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
       
      The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
       
      The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
       
      The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
       
      The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
       
      The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
       
      The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
       
      The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
       
      The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
       
      The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
       
      The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
       
      The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
       
      The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
       
      The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
       
      The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
       
      url=https://flic.kr/p/H2Q9pV]The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
       
       
       
       
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