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Pyestock 2 Visits early 2013

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    • By Andy
      I visited the chocolate factory already more than four years ago. Inside it was partly very dark - much darker than it looks in the photos. The plaster had fallen from the ceiling; a gray damp mud lay on the floor and stuck stubbornly to the shoes.
      After the owner died, the factory was closed over 20 years ago. The widow of the manufacturer still lives in a dilapidated house next to the factory. In the past years, the condition has worsened a lot. Meanwhile, the roof of the former factory has almost completely collapsed.
       
       
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    • By HitGirl
      Explored with one other non member
      Fab little place with the most beautiful stairs i have ever seen








    • By skankypants
      My first post on here,so hope i dont mess it up,,,here are a couple of pics of a place i found yesturday in Shropshire....fully boarded from the inside,so no shots of internals unfortunatly...think it would be a belter though...






      Hope this works......
    • By silverainbow
      This shelter is at the site of Fan Bay Battery a WWII site originally comprising 3 x 6" guns with associated magazines, shelters, Plotting room, Admin and accomodation areas. Today only traces of the gun pits can be found underneath the undergrowth and all surface buildings have been demolished.
      How ever there are still extensive underground remains to be found at the site, the largest of which is the deep shelter, This was constructed in 1941 by No.172 Tunneling Coy Royal Engineers, it is still accessible as are the magazines.
      Visited with Dan H (Non Member) so on with a few Pics, Firstly the one of the Magazines





      And now the deep shelter which in my Opinion is still more than worth a visit











      Thats all Folks
    • By BadBatz
      Another one from our trip down South.
      More goodness revealed by SK!
      Here's some history.
      In 1864, Fr Herbert Vaughan, the later Cardinal Vaughan, gained approval to build a missionary seminary in England. On the 28th February 1871, after considerable difficulties had been overcome, the new seminary in Mill Hill, London, was built and occupied under the patrimony of St Joseph.
      Fr Vaughan's outstanding trust in St Joseph was thus rewarded. Mindful of St Joseph's finding of the stable for Mary when no other roof was to be found, Vaughan, on his first approach to the landowners of the new seminary, carried with him in a parcel a little statuette of St Joseph. When the landowner showed him the door after refusing Fr Vaughan's negotiations, Vaughan asked if he might leave the parcel in the house saying that he had some other business to attend to and he would collect it later in the day. When he returned, the landowner, Mr Druce, had changed his mind and the land was for sale.
      In 1871, this same statuette was solemnly installed in the simple little cloister of the seminary bearing the inscriptionOeconomus Domus Nostrae (Provider of our Home). The laying of the foundation stone of the seminary was a very public occasion on the 19th March 1871, the Feast of St Joseph, with the ceremony performed by Archbishop Manning. All that was required now was the funding to actually build and finish the church!
      The Holy Father had agreed that the Church would be the home of England's national shrine to St Joseph and fittingly, on the feast of St Joseph in 1873, the church was officially opened. The debts were finally paid off in March 1874, and the church was consecrated.
      By a special indult of Pope Pius IX, Cardinal Manning was permitted to crown the statue of St Joseph, which, with its altar, was declared the national shrine of Saint Joseph for England & Wales. This ceremony was performed in the presence of the hierarchy of England and Wales on 13th April 1874, and the statue became one of only a handful of crowned statues of St Joseph in the world.
      The once thriving English and European seminary of St Josephs in Mill Hill, has now given way to the reality that most of the Missionary Vocations are coming from Africa, only a few from England. The number of vocations from Africa is testimony to the great work and witness of the Mill Hill Missionary Fathers and the seminary of St Josephs. The Mill Hill site of St Joseph's closed on 1st July 2006. The new seminary of the Mill Hill fathers will be built where their vocations are strongest - in Africa.
      A big question mark hung over the shrine of St Joseph. The Mill Hill Fathers, eager to preserve their patrimony and to continue to foster devotion to the Patron not only of their order but also of the Church and of families, entrusted the shrine to the Benedictine monks of Farnborough. The shrine was transferred early in 2008 to the south transept of the Abbey Church where it continues to be a focus of devotion.

      Mint corridoors.

      And corners

      Chapel, used as a film set so repainted in places.

      Sun playing ball.

      Looking like I'm from an 80's electro band.....(Thanks SK)

      View from the top.

      Frontage.

      Rear view.
      Mint day all round!
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