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    • By obscureserenity
      Mineral Springs Bath House
      The construction of the Mineral Springs Bath House  began in 1907. This was in order to bring in more tourism and wealth into the area. The town it was built in was an excellent location to host a bath house, as it was well known for it's rich mineral water sources which was believed to have medicinal properties. During the start of the 20th century mineral baths were a very fashionable and popular leisure activity. It took 3 years to build, with the help of local residents and neighbouring villages. It was finally unveiled with a ceremony in 1911.

      The materials which were used for the interior were designed in Vienna, France and Belgium and it was the most expensive healing bath in Bulgaria at that current time. Typical to most bath houses, it was separated into two sections, one for the men and another for the women. Both areas accommodated for it's visitors with a large circular pool, changing rooms and 10 bathtubs. The baths also provided central heating facilities, the main parts of the building were kept consistently at 15°C, the changing rooms at 28°C and the baths themselves were 32°C. The bath house was also equip with a clinic, admin offices and a large laundry room.

      Sadly the Mineral Springs Baths eventually closed in 2001, due to the decline in interest and popularity along with the lack of investment by the local government.
      As always, visited with @darbians on a long weekend trip to Bulgaria. We were both feeling pretty optimistic once we'd seen the grand looking exterior on arrival and fortunately the interior certainly lived up to our expectations.















      If you've got this far, thanks for reading 
    • By sj9966
      Last explore of 2012 brought us to this old Post Office in the middle of Steeltown.
      I don’t know how long it has been closed but it looks to have been quite some time. There's not that much to see inside but it has some great decay and a cool spiral staircase.
      Visited with Rusty, Andre Govia & Chard.
      Here's a few pictures.













    • By sj9966
      I'm sure you all know this place first hand, it was a very popular place and it's had a lot of Urbex traffic pass through it.
      Visited with Rusty on a Sheffield day trip back in September 2011
      A real cool old place, I'm not sure of it's current status.

    • By oldskool
      Im not at all religious, in fact im an atheist,but walking round this place made me think twice about things.

      Ushaw College
      Ushaw College (St Cuthbert's College, Ushaw) is a Roman Catholic seminary, . It was founded at Douai as the English College, Douai in France in 1568, which moved to Ushaw Moor, four miles west of Durham in England in 1808 and became a Licensed Hall of the University of Durham in 1968. It is independent of the University but offers courses validated by the University. Both Church and lay students study at the college. In 2002 the College rejected a report from the Roman Catholic hierarchy that it should merge with St Mary's College, Oscott, near Birmingham. In October 2010 it was announced that the college is to close in the summer of 2011 due to the shortage of vocations in the Roman Catholic Church, and that the site is likely to be sold...
      Some of the college's buildings are no longer used, but some have been converted into a conference centre. The main college buildings are grade II listed, however the College Chapel is grade II* and the Chapel of St Michael is grade I. The Refectory was designed and built by Pugin, as was the original chapel although this was later dismantled and replaced by the present building designed by Dunn and Hansom. The original college buildings (1804�1808) were designed by James Taylor.

      (College of St. Cuthbert)
      A combined college and seminary for the six dioceses that were comprised in the old Northern Vicariate of England. The government is vested in a united board of the bishops of these dioceses, with a president, a vice-president, and staff of about 30 professors. The average number of students is over 300, divided into three courses: the preparatory course, including about 80 boys, thehumanity course with about 130, and the philosophical and theological with about 100.

      The suppression of the "Grands Anglais" at Douai the seminary which for 200 years had meant the Catholic Faith to England, was only one of the many far-reaching results that the French Revolution brought in its train. The immediate necessity under which the English Catholics found themselves of providing for the continuation of its work led to a project of establishing one college for the whole of England on English soil. Many difficulties supervened and finally the question arranged itself by the division of the refugee students from Douai into two bodies, one of which found shelter at Old Hall near Ware, while the remainder (mainly composed of students who were destined for the Northern Vicariate), after temporary sojourns at Tudhoe and Pontop, two villages in the vicinity of Durham, settled on 15 Oct., 1794, at Crook Hall, about eleven miles N.W. of that city. There they re-established Douai for the north of England, and it lived its life under the guidance of one of its former professors, Thomas Eyre, of John Lingard, the future historian, and of John Daniel, the actual president of Douai at its suppression, who seems to have been formally installed as president for a few days. Ten years' growth made Crook Hall inadequate for its purpose, and in 1804 Bishop William Gibson began the buildings at Ushaw to which four years later, the colony finallymigrated, the first detachment on 19 July, the rest on 2 August, 1808. There they found three sides of a massive quadrangle, with a frontage of about 170 feet and a depth of 220, ready for their habitation. The fourth side of this quadrangle was not added till 1819, under the president who succeeded Eyre in 1811, Dr. John Gillow; but no further material addition was made to the buildings until the fourth president, Charles Newsham, succeeded in 1837. He realized that, if Ushaw was adequately to continue its career, no pains nor expense must be spared to enlarge its capacity and to bring its arrangements into line with more modern requirements. The pioneers of the Gothic revival were at hand to assist him in this, and from the plans of the two Pugins and the two Hansoms the second church with its attendant chapels, the library, infirmary, museum, exhibition hall, lavatories, kitchens, and farm buildings, and a separate establishment for the younger boys, all sprang up around the old Georgian quadrangle.

      In much more than a convention sense Monsignor Newsham may be called the founder of modern Ushaw; and the best evidence of how far-seeing were his plans and achievements lies in the fact that for twenty years after his death, in 1863, practically no addition was made to the fabric. In 1883 Monsignor Wrennal found it necessary to build a third church. Under Bishop Wilkinson, whoassumed the presidency in 1890, which he held conjointly with the Bishopric of Hexham and Newcastle till his death in 1909, a fresh period of activity began. A covered swimming bath, a gymnasium, two new dormitories, and over forty new living rooms, the enlargement of the exhibition hall, the elaborate decoration of the church with the erection of a new high altar, are all the products of his nineteen years of presidency. Two presidents have held office since his death: Monsignor Joseph Corbishly, who survived him only a year, and Monsignor William Henry Brown, under whom new lecture rooms have been erected to accommodate the largely increased numbers of philosophy and divinity students. Altogether the present blocks of buildings, with their enclosed courts, cover a rectangle 880 feet long by 420 feet broad; the outbuildings, grounds, and campus cover over 100 acres, and the whole estate, with its home and outlying farms, includes between 1200 and 1300 acres.

      Many objects of historical and artistic interest are preserved in the college. Lingard bequeathed to it all his books and papers, which included an early manuscript and the proof sheets of his "History of England" with about 1500 of his letters; Wiseman is represented by the manuscripts of "Fabiola" and the "Hidden Gem", and of many sermons, lectures, and letters, while Eyre gathered for it a valuable collection of documents dealing with the English Catholic history of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, and intended for a continuation of Dodd's "Church History". Thelibrary, in which these are stored, contains about 45,000 volumes, mainly of theological and historical interest. It is especially rich in early printed liturgical books and in seventeenth-century controversy. Examples of Wynken de Worde's "York Manual", Higden's "Polychronicon", the "Nuremburg Chronicle", the "Ulm Cosmographs", the "Complutensian Polyglot", are found on its shelves, and, perhaps more interesting than all, about forty works that belonged to the pre-Reformation library of Durham Abbey and which still retain the original monastic bindings.

      Visited with Host and Frank, thanks to Bugsuperster.....

      Thanks for looking Oldskool.........
    • By oldskool
      Ive wanted to shoot this place for a long time so hooked up with Rusty and made a full day out of it, this being the first of four sites .......ManorG T was settled in the Anglo-Saxon era. Ælfric of Abingdon held the manor of G T by 990 and became Archbishop of Canterbury in 995. Ælfric died in 1005, leaving G T to Saint Alban's Abbey. In 1049-1052 the abbey leased G TLeofstan, abbot, and St Albans Abbey, to Tova, widow of Wihtric, in return for 3 marks of gold and an annual render of honey; lease, for her lifetime and that of her son, Godwine, of land at Cyrictiwa, with reversion to St Albans.In Old English toponym Cyrictiwa means "Church Tew", distinguishing the village from neighbouring Little Tew which lacked its own church, and Nether Worton which seems not to have had its own chapel until the 12th century.[2]William the Conqueror granted the manor to his step-brother Odo, Bishop of Bayeux, and it was recorded amongst Odo's estates in the Domesday Book in 1086.T G Park was created before the latter part of the 16th century.Sir Lawrence Tanfield, Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer, bought G T estate in 1611 from Edward Rainsford. He deprived the villagers of timber, causing some of the cottages to fall into disrepair. Tanfield enclosed part of G Ts lands in 1622. However, most of the parish's common lands were not enclosed until Parliament passed an Enclosure Act for G T in 1767.1.
      2.3.After Tanfield died in 1626, followed by his wife Elizabeth in 1629, G T passed to his young son-in-lawLucius Cary, 2nd Viscount Falkland.In the 1630s Lucius gathered a circle of writers and scholars at G T including Abraham Cowley, Ben Jonson and Edmund Waller. During the English Civil War the young Viscount fought on the Royalist side and was killed in 1643 at the First Battle of Newbury. G T remained in the Cary family until the death ofAnthony Cary, 5th Viscount of Falkland in 1694.Viscount Cary lived in a large manor house which seems to have been built in or before the early part of the 17th century and seems to have been extended in the latter part of the 17th century. It was demolished in about 1800 but outlying structures from about 1700 including its stables, dovecote and stone gatepiers survive. 1780 and 1793 G T estate was bought by George Stratton, who had made a fortune in the East India Company. He died in March 1800 and was succeeded by his son George Frederick Stratton. The manor house had evidently fallen into disrepair, as the Strattons lived in a smaller Georgian dower house slightly to the south of it and had the manor house demolished in about 1803. In 1808 George Frederick Stratton engaged the Scots botanist and garden designer John Loudon, who laid out north and south drives in G T Park and planted ornamental trees in and around the village, which today enhance its picturesque appearance.In 1815-1816 Matthew Robinson Boulton, the son of the manufacturer Matthew Boulton of Soho, Birmingham, bought GT Estate. In 1825 Boulton added aGothic Revival library to the east end of the house, and in the middle of the 19th century the Boulton family added a large Tudor style section to the west end.]G T remained with the Boulton family until M.E. Boulton died without heirs in 1914. ...8.9.10.Next stop The Horders House ....11.1213.14.Swimming Pool W. G. for looking Oldsk@@l.............