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My last foray with exploring this year ended with beauty.

After a stupid amount of driving over the previous days, I was shattered, driving from as far south as I've been before, driving to Wales to drop of Lowri an then heading ver to the Midlands to get some rest with Project Mayhem who kindly put me up for the night. I set off to Chaise Abbey after some a tip off from AndyK, I was off as soon as I woke to get it done before the tour bus arrived.

After a well deserved McDonalds, I arrived at my parking location and set off on a long convoluted route I chose as the one that would keep me away from any game keepers and locals. Apart from acting like a gun dog and rising up a few pheasants, well 200 or so, I eventually reached the outsite the Abbey and it was a glorious site.

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Quickly finding a way in, there were many ways I saw from my initial walk around, I was in and decided nervous about being inside, there was a lot of rotten floors and joists; stairs had collapsed, floors collapsed, but work had been ongoing and looked safe enough to carry on.

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Quickly finding my way around, I find the room most come to see and the name of the location - the Chaise Longue Room

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The main hall

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Grand Staircase

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Some of the furniture and Fireplaces were outstanding.

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Couple of the grand rooms

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Always great to find see some vintage bicycles :)

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Dolls chair and chess / chequers table

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Heading upwards

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Really enjoye this nice relaxed explore, spent a couple hours inside, and had a long walk back to the motor.

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Thanks for looking!

Edited by Stussy

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    • By Gromr123
      Another local one that I've been wanting to do for ages, but never got round to it until now. 
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      History
       
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      Photos
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

    • By crabb
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      5. This tells me they were short of funds.

      6.

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      following the decline of industries Sheffield offers plenty interns of urban exploring... from abandoned breweries, redundant steel works and leisure sites. It's difficult to experience all this in a single outing therefore I have compiled this into three years of exploring the city. Having started out at relatively low level explores and advancing this further to more harder to reach buildings here are some of the most important abandoned buildings Sheffield offers. If not for the buildings themselves Sheffield's street art is an important part of the explore. Often explorers take to photography for the art which is of a high standard coming from a far to experience this. Historically the buildings offer more than the art its self... the buildings often dating back to the victorian era give great scope to capture real history of the city. Often buildings have either been destroyed or are in the process of this. Been able to capture the buildings in their original state albeit a derelict one captures the cities past... and more importantly the history of British industry. 
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
       
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
       
       

       

       
      END
    • By Kev C

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    • By little_boy_explores
      In 1847, Joseph Watts of Dewsbury and William Stones (1827 -1894) of Sheffield began brewing together at the Cannon Brewery in Sheffield's Shalesmoor district near Kelham Island. ... He renamed it the Cannon Brewery after his original premises.

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      The owner of the site is a demolition contractor and has submitted an application seeking permission for his business, Hague Plant, to bulldoze the buildings on the 0.7 hectare plot which, in documents drawn up by R Bryan Planning, are described as being of utilitarian design and of no historic or architectural significance. The owner is keen to redevelop the former brewery but has said that it is not effectively marketable in its current state, especially as the high cost of demolition and potential decontamination, particularly from asbestos, are a deterrent to developers.

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      Been looking at this as a potential explore for sometime... The buildings and architecture are something else and anyone who's anyone on the Sheffield graffiti scene have decorated the building with some great pieces.. The former brewery is in poor condition but offers explorers a great opportunity to appreciate the history and architecture of the former brewery. A real shame when they decided to pull the building as this is a real part of Sheffields brewing past.. explore whilst you still have chance.. as this building offers plenty for all.
       
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      Graffiti on site
       
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      22. My favourite pic I took of this place

       
      Le fin
       
      "Times have changed, the place in its current condition is trashed and flooded... (2018)"
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