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Nelly

Hole in the ground in Harlow

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Found a hole in the ground in Harlow!!

Local rumors say that there was a Cold War bunker under the town and there is even a small mention on Subbrit

"As well as county and county borough controls, counties could establish county sub-controls as a level between the districts and county to assist in the life saving operations and to provide communications. In this way Essex that formed part of Sub Region 4.2 with its SRC at the old Kelvedon Hatch bunker (the other SRCs for Eastern Region were at Hertford and Bawburgh) had its County Control in Chelmsford. Below this were 4 county sub controls at Mistley, Chelmsford, Billericay and Harlow each of which linked between 6 and 10 urban and rural districts"

Could this be an emergency exit from the bunker??

Who knows???

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It was a lovely way to spend a Sunday afternoon, the vid is brill! And nice shot of my arse at the end, thanks for that!!

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I'd be looking for a secondary entrance/ exit too, although it's highly probable to be similarly 'blocked'. It's a great find Nelly, looks WW2 to me based on what we've seen of it so far. Can't wait to see the rest of it :)

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      The Photos


      I.




      II.




      III.




      IV.




      V.




      VI.




      VII.




      VIII.




      IX.




      X.




      XI.




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