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UK Kelton Convent, Liverpool - May 2014

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Visited this spot in March with a friend of mine who is not a member of the forum. Rotten to the core this one, dodgy floors that got worse as you went nearer to the section where the roof/ceiling has collapsed taking two floors with it. In this area there is quite big holes in the flooring and parts of the ceiling don't look to great. Parts of the basement where interesting with one section looking like a room had collapsed from the above floor leaving it on a strange angle. Bit of a mad mooch this one, worth a look if you are in the area I'd say.

Built around 1800 as a private residence called Kelton with extensive land/gardens and a lodge.

Around 1900, the Catholic Church purchased it as a home for "Penitents and Children" and was part of the "Sacred Heart convents", it was also known as the Kelton (House of Providence)". Basically it was a home for "Unmarried Mothers", the children were adopted off and the mothers were effectively in servitude, usually working in laundries. At some time the two hall extensions and chapel were built, another large building was built on the land which may have been a laundry. The convent appears to have closed in the early 1980s.

The lodge is now fully restored and is a private residence, most of the land has been built on, there was a developer interested in the convent, planning permission was applied for but he went bust before getting started.

FROM 2008

Around £7.5m is to be spent to restore a derelict former convent in South Liverpool into luxury apartments

The former Kelton Convent, Woodlands Road, Aigburth, will be converted into 14 apartments and 26 new flats will also be built in two new wings in the grounds to help pay for the restoration of the existing grade II listed buildings. Liverpool councils planning committee heard yesterday that without the new flats the restoration would not be possible as the work will cost £7.5m but the apartments will sell for less than £5m. Five nearby residents wrote to the council to oppose the scheme for a variety of reasons which included protests about the increase in traffic in the area and loss of amenity. Architect Richard Cass told the committee that the building would be restored to its former glory.

I guess this is the failed attempt at renovation of the convent.

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Thanks For Looking

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There's usually a gem or two even in mashed places, noticed a very nice ceiling survived in one room. Well done on getting out alive too!

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Such a shame that its been allowed to fall into such a state as could be special.

The laws to protect them are failing.

We might not be able to save the world but we can capture before falls :thumb

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Thank you everyone for the kind words, glad you liked the pictures :D Yeah, the place was a right state. Can't see how anything can be done with it to be honest it's that far gone. Worth a mooch if your in the area though.

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See I can provide something interesting here, me and my group went through maybe  two months ago, and I end up in the room with the boiler in, in the basement and there's a control box in there with the key still in, which is weird because I've been in there with my group while a group of 15-20 kids ran rampant through the place. This key is my 'gem" as Jones said.167kqrt.jpg

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You will have to get a report up on the place mate. Would be nice to see what sort of state it's in these days. 

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