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Matt Inked

UK Lincoln Cathedral - Lincoln - June 2014

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Visited with Hamtagger

After a recce 2 days previous we were itching to scale the Cathedral walls like ninjas. With cameras surrounding the building and nosey neighbours in every house, we knew we needed to be careful. The fact that the building is 700 years old made me a bit paranoid that if we used any part of it for support we would damage parts of it. I didn’t realise how high the building actually is until we were at the top! (510 feet above sea level) Climbing additional ladders at this height was enough to make my bum-hole twitch a bit too.

The climb went well and it was nice to finally have got up there but I broke my toe on they way down with what was probably only a 6 foot drop. (I felt like a retard) :banghead

History Lesson

Building commenced in 1088 and continued in several phases throughout the medieval period. It was reputedly the TALLEST building in the world for 238 years (1311–1549). The central spire collapsed in 1549 and was never rebuilt. There are many legends and myths about the Cathedral and it's surroundings and it was also used in the movie "The Da Vinci Code" which is pretty cool if you haven't seen it.

Finally, The famous Lincoln Imp - the little devil perched high in the Angel Choir overlooking St Hugh's shrine. He was turned to stone, according to the legend, by the angels because he caused mayhem in the Cathedral. He is now the symbol of Lincolnshire and the Lincoln football team (the Imps)

External

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Jesus has been poo'd on

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Disturbing Headless Statues

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A skull eating a coin (This looks more modern than the others)

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A Fire Breathing Dragon (That scratches walls)

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No Admittance

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Almost at the top

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The Arch

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Me and Hamtagger

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Looking Across the City (I think thats the Priest/Organists house

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I really wanted to take pictures through these windows but didn't want to risk damaging the roof

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Probably shouldn't have used my flash at midnight

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Thank you for reading my report. This is definitely ones of my favourite places so far, shame about the lack of pictures (Some were taken on my iphone) but we had to be careful with people walking past every 5 minutes and walking on a 700 year old building.

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Fair play guys, this sounds like a butt clencher, I bet you were buzzing all the way to the top and back down, well done on a cracking effort :thumb

It looks like the virgin Mary is in danger of being poo'd on by Jesus himself as well ;)

:comp:

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Fair play guys, this sounds like a butt clencher, I bet you were buzzing all the way to the top and back down, well done on a cracking effort :thumb

It looks like the virgin Mary is in danger of being poo'd on by Jesus himself as well ;)

:comp:

It was awesome, I lived in Lincoln most of my life and always thought about how good going to the top would be. It doesn't help that it's situated on a hill thats 238 feet above the rest of the town so it feels even higher when you're up there.

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