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Germany Illuminati graveyard - visit 06/2014

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Great location this one, only seen it pop up recently as I somehow missed this report. Amazing that the pyramid is accessible with coffins sat there like that, it was quite a haunting report at first and then Charlie made me giggle :D

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    • By Andy
      The sanatorium Ernst T. was built in 1915. Later it was in use as a military hospital and FDGB holiday home. In 1995 it was abandoned.   1.   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17  
    • By SpiderMonkey
      Peppermint Powerplant - 

      The plant was purpose built to aid a neighboring paper mill, which closed at the same time as the power plant.
      It contains a single Siemens set, which looks great in peppermint green. This was a fairly quick walk around because the place is so small, I didn't even take many photos, although it's a really nice little power station. 

      Visited with @AndyK! and @Kriegaffe9


       

       

       

       

       

       
      Cheers 
    • By Lavino
      Visited this site as was in the area. The main house is currently having work done. But still has all these abandoned cars around the back it's a real shame to see them just wasting away. Was a nice stroll around this place looking at the old jags so he's a bit of history from the web and some pics like I say not much to see off the mansion as it is stripped back to bare brick...
      It's very difficult to dig up much information at all on this enigmatic building but we have discovered that it was built in 1869 by a Mr. Henry Hoyle Hardman. Henry was the son of George Hardman, a successful local businessman, who built Oakhill House - RIGHT - now the Rossendale Museum, in Rawtenstall. In view of the fact that Horncliffe House as it was then known was such a grand home, it is clear that Henry was also a successful businessman just like his father and in fact he owned Hardman Mill in Newhallhey which is just down in the valley and practically overlooked by the house. Henry died in 1888 but his wife Emily continued to live there until she died a few years later in 1896. The house passed to Annie Hardman (their daughter?) and she lived there until about 1903. The house and it's contents were then sold to a Mr. Roland Rawlinson who owned Myrtle Grove Mill in Waterfoot.
      And now we have a huge gap with no idea who, what or when until we reach the 1960s!
      At this time Lancashire County Council operated a care home for the elderly at the house until some time in the 1980s. Whilst it was a care home it was still known as Horncliffe House however when it was subsequently sold on in 1993 it was turned into a hotel and function venue, being re-named Horncliffe Mansions in the process. The operators at that time were Horncliffe Mansions Ltd. but the limited company was dissolved on 23rd. June, 2009 and the hotel closed. It appears now that it has passed back into private ownership once again and apparently the new owner, a property developer, is waiting to hear if he is to be granted permission to change the house back to a residential dwelling. An amusing anecdote was quoted in the local paper - apparently the owner started work in his youth as a florist's assistant and used to deliver flowers to the house when it was a care home. He always said at the time that he would love to own the house!
      To the rear of the building there is a large, modern, single story function room big enough to seat several hundred people, and literature within the house itself confirms its use as a hotel quite unequivocally. Strangely though a document in the conservatory hinted at a prospective change of use to an old people's home but the document does NOT appear to be from the time period when the house actually functioned in that role! A planning application lodged with Rossendale Borough Council in 2008 states that the owner wished to convert the building from a hotel to a dwelling house, but that was during the period of ownership of the house by the hotel company, not by a private individual!
      Abandoned then circa 2008/9 - just three years - so why on earth has the owner let it fall into such an appalling state of dereliction in such a short time?
      A further enigma is the number of old Jaguar cars standing on the lane at the top of the grounds next to a very old, and boarded up, cottage and what appeared to be recently deployed flood precautions on that lane. This shows that someone is still going up to the house periodically.
      So... after a morning of searching on t'internet all we have managed to find out is that Doctor David Bellamy - he of, "Gwapple me gwapenuts" fame - attended a protest meeting at the hotel back in 2004 when the local NIMBYs decided they didn't like the idea of the nearby moors being used as a site for those appalling windmill power stations. His presence clearly didn't do much good though because they just went ahead and built them anyway!














    • By The_Raw
      In 1910 a garrison of the Imperial German Army was established at the Waldstadt section of the Wünsdorf community. By the First World War in 1914 it had become Europe’s largest military base. During World War I it was the site of several prisoner-of-war camps, including the "crescent camp" (Halbmondlager) for Muslim fighters of the Triple Entente, where the first wooden mosque in Germany was erected. From 1939 to 1945, Wünsdorf hosted the underground headquarters of the German Wehrmacht (OKW) and Army's High Command (OKH). After World War II the area became a Soviet military camp, the largest outside Russia, until 1990. Since then it has been returned to civilian use. 
       
      You can actually pay the security guards 15 Euros to take a wander around here but we chose to sneak in instead and try our luck. It just so happened it was our lucky day as there was a nude photo shoot taking place, so all the doors were wide open! Result! Anyway, on with the photos. 
       
      Wünsdorf HQ
       
      1. Haus der Offiziere (Officers’ House). Unfortunately we didn't see inside here as security was onto us before we had a chance (cue much hiding....)

       
      2. Statue of Lenin

       
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      10. This is where the naked girl appeared from randomly! 

       
      11. Plant room valves labelled in Russian 

       
      12. Theatre Entrance

       
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      15. Still kept in stunning condition

       
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      Hospital
       
      17. Some nice natural decay inside here

       
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      20. Russian newspapers were pasted onto the walls underneath the paintwork throughout 

       
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      23. The doors were padded both inside and out along this corridor. Perhaps a secure ward. 

       
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      Maybach & Zeppelin Bunkers
       
      25. Maybach I was built in 1937 and became operational in 1939 as the threat of war loomed.  The complex consisted of twelve three-storey buildings above ground designed to look from the air like local housing, and two floors of interlinked bunkers with two-foot thick walls below. Deeper in the subterranean levels of Maybach I, there were wells for drinking water and plumbing, air-filter systems for protection against gas attacks, and diesel engines to keep the system operational. Later in the Second World War, the site was further camouflaged by the use of netting. During 1945 the site was heavily bombed by both the British and Americans.

       
      26. The entrances were all partially destroyed by the Russians in 1946 to make the bunkers ineffective for military use so we had to scramble underneath this mess of twisted steel and collapsed rocks to gain access.

       
      27. Inside the walls were filthy from fire and smoke damage.

       
      28. The ring tunnel connecting all the Maybach bunkers was backfilled so we were only able to walk a few hundred metres in any direction before we reached a dead end.

       
      29. Russian scribbles cover the walls and ceiling throughout 

       
      30. Handy that someone has placed these beer crates as stepping stones over an oil spillage

       
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      32. Another small bunker a couple of hundred metres away.

       
      33. This small entrance leads to a much larger interior 

       
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      35. One of the entrances to the Zeppelin bunker, a highly modern underground communications centre which had walls up to 3.2 meters thick and a 1 metre shell around it. The Nazis’ entire second world war campaign was guided from the Zeppelin bunker, providing direct contact through telex to the fronts at Stalingrad, France, Holland and even Africa. Constructed in 1937 it was one of the largest newsgathering hubs in operation during the Second World War.  The Zeppelin bunker later formed part of the Soviet Cold war era installations in Wünsdorf under the name Ranet. Further bunker installations were subsequently added to house the central command and communications functions of the Soviet army in the GDR. The bunker grounds were demilitarised following the closing of the army base in 1994, when the last Russian troops left Germany

       
      36. Unfortunately the bunker was sealed beyond this blast door and we ran out of time. We will be back!   

       
      Thanks for looking 
       
       
    • By Andy
      The history of the building already begun in the 1850s. Originally, a wood factory was built on the property, which was destroyed by a fire in the second half of the 19th century. Then there was a brewery with a restaurant, later a holiday home / recreation home of the “Trade Union Confederation”.
       
      The hotel, located near to a swimming pool in the forest, opened in the mid-1990s.
      Last guest reviews on the Internet report about unfriendly staff, bad food and unhygienic conditions. That might have been one of the reasons why the hotel was finally closed about 10 years ago.
       
       
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